Anglo American Platinum selects Topsoes WSA tech for sulphur emissions control

first_imgAnglo American Platinum has signed a contract for Topsoe’s world-leading Wet gas Sulphuric Acid (WSA) sulphur emissions control technology for their platinum smelter facility in Polokwane, South Africa. The statement said: “The WSA technology ensures compliance with environmental regulations and offers a perfect match to the often challenging requirements of metallurgical smelters and roasters. WSA is a proven and very cost-efficient technology to control sulphur emissions and produces commercial-grade sulphuric acid that can be sold.”The WSA plant is designed to drastically reduce emissions of SO2 from the platinum smelter from around 90,000 mg/Nm3 to less than 1,200 mg/Nm3. It will produce up to 148 t per day of sulfuric acid. “Sulphur emissions control has become a business prerequisite in the South African smelter industry. We wanted a solution that would ensure environmental compliance now and in the foreseeable future as well as make a convincing business case. WSA ticked both fields,” says Dr Lloyd Nelson, Head of Smelting & Refining Technology, Metallurgy, Anglo American Platinum.Newly enforced regulations in South Africa limits the emission of sulphur (SO2) and requires sulphur-emitting facilities to install an abatement technology. WSA is a leading sulfur emissions control technology for wet gas applications. Its recovery of process heat makes it extremely energy-efficient and consequently it uses no or very little support fuel. WSA does not produce any waste and requires only minimal cooling water.The WSA plant ordered by AAP will be the second in Africa. As governments and investors across the continent implement stricter environmental guidelines, the technology is expected to be adopted by many more African companies. Around the world, 160 WSA plants have been commissioned. The contract covers basic engineering, license, proprietary equipment, catalyst, training, and supervision services. Hatch in South Africa have been selected by AAP for Engineering, Procurement, and Construction Management (EPCM) and will be managing the completion of the project on behalf of AAP. Haldor Topsoe is a world leader in high-performance catalysts and proprietary technologies for the chemical and refining industrieslast_img read more

Irish watchdog to investigate Facebooks controversial mood experiment

first_imgBRITISH AUTHORITIES WILL question Facebook over an experiment in which the social network secretly manipulated the feelings of users to test their mood, officials said Wednesday.Facebook tampered with the system used to create news feeds for 700,000 users to test “emotional contagion” for one week in 2012 without their knowledge. It did not seek explicit consent beforehand, but claims its Terms of Service contract with users permits blanket “research”.The Information Commissioner’s Office, Britain’s independent data watchdog, said it was now looking into the case.“We’re aware of this issue and will be speaking to Facebook, as well as liaising with the Irish data protection authority, to learn more about the circumstances,” a spokesman told AFP.Facebook’s European headquarters are based in the Irish capital Dublin, meaning EU laws, not US ones, apply to its operations.News of the psychological experiment has caused anger among Facebook’s more than one billion active users, with some calling it “super disturbing”, “creepy” and “evil”.Researchers wanted to see if the number of positive or negative words in messages the users read determined whether they then posted positive or negative content in their status updates.The study, conducted by researchers affiliated with Facebook and Cornell University and the University of California at San Francisco in the United States, was published in June.Facebook said it was “happy” to answer the British regulator’s questions.“It’s clear that people were upset by this study and we take responsibility for it,” a Facebook spokesman told AFP by email.“We want to do better in the future and are improving our process based on this feedback.“The study was done with appropriate protections for people’s information and we are happy to answer any questions regulators may have.”- © AFP, 2014Read: Google bought a music app which creates playlists based on your mood >Read: Author of controversial Facebook study says he’s sorry for anxiety caused >last_img read more