All communications can now be intercepted under new law signed by Mugabe

first_img RSF_en August 6, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 All communications can now be intercepted under new law signed by Mugabe September 1, 2020 Find out more Reporters Without Borders regrets that the Interception of Communications Act was finally signed into law by President Robert Mugabe on 3 August. It enables the government to intercept phone calls, emails and faxes with the declared aim of protecting national security.“The promulgation of this law is further evidence of Mugabe’s desire to keep news and information under close control,” the organisation said. “Zimbabwe had already given itself one of the world’s most repressive legislative arsenals as regards press freedom. Now all forms of communication have been placed under surveillance.”—————–15.06.2007 – Parliament’s lower house approves bill for intercepting communications Reporters Without Borders voiced concern today about the Zimbabwean House of Assembly’s approval on 13 June of a draft law that would allow the government to intercept mail, phone calls and email without having to seek a court order. The government submitted a similar bill to parliament last year but withdrew it after complaints from national and international organisations.“This bill is evidence that the government is determined to have strict control over information,” the press freedom organisation said. “The fight against terrorism is constantly used by oppressive regimes as a pretext for cracking down on freedoms. We appeal to the senate, which is due to consider the bill soon, to reject it.”If adopted, the law will expose journalists, NGOs and human rights activists to the possibility – a real one in Zimbabwe – of being accused of representing a threat to national security. Reports November 27, 2020 Find out more ——————————————- 31.07.06 – Bill for monitoring e-mail and mobile phone calls submitted to parliamentReporters Without Borders condemned the Interception of Communications Bill that was submitted on 26 July to the Zimbabwean parliament. It would allow the authorities to intercept and read e-mail messages and listen to mobile phone calls without needing to get permission from a judge.“We deplore this new proposed law, which would clearly violate every citizen’s privacy, the freedom of expression and opinion, and the right of journalists to protect the confidentiality of their sources,” the press freedom organisation said.“Although not on the front line of the fight against terrorism, the regime is clearly using this as a pretext for silencing its critics in the press and political opposition, and we therefore call on the parliamentary legal committee, parliamentarians in general and, if it gets that far, the supreme court, to reject the bill,” Reporters Without Borders added.The parliamentary legal committee is currently examining the bill to determine if it conforms to the constitution. If approved, it will be go before the entire parliament.—————————–09.05.2006 – Serious threat seen in proposed law on intercepting communicationsA bill presented to the Zimbabwean parliament at the end of March will give the government a free hand to intercept its citizens’ phone calls, e-mail messages and letters without providing any credible safeguards, Reporters Without Borders said today after obtaining a copy of the bill, the text of which is now available on the organisation’s site (www.rsf.org).“We fear the worst,” Reporters Without Borders said. “This bill will allow the authorities to place journalists and opposition politicians under surveillance without any control from the courts. It also directly threatens the local contacts of international media and NGOs. The government will have new tools to ensure that no embarrassing news or information crosses its borders.”The organisation added: “This proposed law is all the more worrying as it will give full powers to transport and communications minister George Charamba, who said at the end of last month that press freedom was just an ‘auxiliary right’.”The bill envisages the creation of an Interception of Communication Monitoring Centre (ICMC) staffed by “experts” able to spy on every kind of data. It says that telecommunications companies such as Internet Service Providers will have to install interception software and set up a direct connection to the ICMC to allow real-time monitoring. Company executives who refuse to comply could face up to three years in prison.The proposed law says the ICMC would provide technical assistance to companies but does not specify what software would be used. However, a South African online newspaper reported in May 2005 that the Zimbabwean government has discussing the acquisition of communication interception technology with China. At the same time, Zimbabwean sources say Chinese equipment is already being used to jam independent radio broadcasts.The bill envisages that the chief of the Defence intelligence, the Director general of the President’s department of national security, the Commissioner of the Zimbabwe Republic Police and the Commissioner-General of the Zimbabwe Revenue authority would all able to submit requests for phone taps and other forms of communications interception to the transport and communications minister. This minister is the only official authorised to issue an interception warrant, which he can do if he thinks a “serious offence has been or is being or will probably be committed” or if there is a “threat to national security”.The warrant issued by the minister will be valid for three months, but he will be able to renew it as often as he likes if he thinks there is “good reason.” And he is not subject to control by any court. It is also alarming that the bill says that an interception request can be made orally in “the case of emergency or the existence of exceptional circumstances.” ————-Create your blog with Reporters without borders: www.rsfblog.org The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa ZimbabweAfrica News Zimbabwean court must free imprisoned journalist who is unwellcenter_img November 12, 2020 Find out more News Receive email alerts Follow the news on Zimbabwe Zimbabwean journalist Hopewell Chin’ono denied bail Organisation Help by sharing this information ZimbabweAfrica Related documents Interception of Communications BillZIP – 3.57 MB News to go furtherlast_img read more

PEDIATRIC RADIOLOGIST

first_imgOngoing/Renewable The School of Medicine and Public Health has a deep and profoundcommitment to diversity both as an end in itself but, also as avaluable means for eliminating health disparities. As such, westrongly encourage applications from candidates who foster andpromote the values of diversity and inclusion. The University of Wisconsin-Madison is engaged in a Title and TotalCompensation (TTC) project to redesign job titles and compensationstructures. As a result of the TTC project, official job titles oncurrent job postings may change in Spring 2020. Job duties andresponsibilities will remain the same. For more information pleasevisit: https://hr.wisc.edu/title-and-total-compensation-study/.Employment will require a criminal background check. It will alsorequire you and your references to answer questions regardingsexual violence and sexual harassment.The University of Wisconsin System will not reveal the identitiesof applicants who request confidentiality in writing, except thatthe identity of the successful candidate will be released. See Wis.Stat. sec. 19.36(7).The Annual Security and FireSafety Report contains current campus safety and disciplinarypolicies, crime statistics for the previous 3 calendar years, andon-campus student housing fire safety policies and fire statisticsfor the previous 3 calendar years. UW-Madison will provide a papercopy upon request; please contact the University of Wisconsin PoliceDepartment . Official Title: Primary focus and duties are in all modalities of PediatricRadiology. Clinical research is expected. Department teachingassignments include medical students, residents, fellows and otherprofessionals. Participate in departmental outreach as appropriate.Participate in departmental, school, university and professionalservice appropriate to the faculty rank. Institutional Statement on Diversity: Employment Class: Contact: Applications Open: Apr 16 2020 Central Daylight TimeApplications Close: Academic Staff-Renewable Degree and Area of Specialization: 221753-AS Instructions to Applicants: The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity andAffirmative Action Employer. We promote excellence throughdiversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply.If you need to request an accommodation because of a disability,you can find information about how to make a request at thefollowing website: https://employeedisabilities.wisc.edu/disability-accommodation-information-for-applicants/ Job no: 221753-ASWork type: Faculty Full or Part Time, Faculty-Full Time,Faculty-Part TimeDepartment: SMPH/RADIOLOGY/RADIOLOGYLocation: MadisonCategories: Health Care, Medical, Social Services The Department of Radiology, UW-Madison School of Medicine andPublic Health is seeking a full-time Radiologist, interested inpursuing an academic career in Pediatric Radiology at the rank ofAssistant, Associate or full Professor on the CHS (Clinical HealthSciences) Track or CT (Clinician-Teacher) Track.The School of Medicine and Public Health has a deep and profoundcommitment to diversity both as an end in itself but, also as avaluable means for eliminating health disparities. As such, westrongly encourage applications from candidates who foster andpromote the values of diversity and inclusion. MD degree NegotiableANNUAL (12 months) Job Number: Diversity is a source of strength, creativity, and innovation forUW-Madison. We value the contributions of each person and respectthe profound ways their identity, culture, background, experience,status, abilities, and opinion enrich the university community. Wecommit ourselves to the pursuit of excellence in teaching,research, outreach, and diversity as inextricably linkedgoals.The University of Wisconsin-Madison fulfills its public mission bycreating a welcoming and inclusive community for people from everybackground – people who as students, faculty, and staff serveWisconsin and the world.For more information on diversity and inclusion on campus, pleasevisit: Diversity andInclusioncenter_img Appointment Type, Duration: Principal Duties: Additional Information: Full or Part Time: 50% – 100% JULY 01, 2020 Sheena [email protected] Access (WTRS): 7-1-1 (out-of-state: TTY: 800.947.3529, STS:800.833.7637) and above Phone number (See RELAY_SERVICE for furtherinformation. ) Department(s): Salary: Work Type: Anticipated Begin Date: A539300-MEDICAL SCHOOL/RADIOLOGY/RADIOLOGY Position Summary: To apply, please go to Jobs At UW, www.jobs.wisc.edu, search forPosition Vacancy Listing # 221753 and select . You will be asked toupload a CV and a Statement of Interest including your career goalsand professional plans.The deadline for assuring full consideration is June 1, 2020,however, positions will remain open and applications may beconsidered until the position is filled. Fellowship training in Pediatric Radiology.For appointment at Associate Professor or Professor rank on CHS orCT track, candidates will meet criteria established by thedepartment and as outlined in the School of Medicine and PublicHealth guidelines for promotion or appointment to Associate orProfessor on the CHS Track or CT Track. License or Certificate: Minimum Years and Type of Relevant Work Experience: Wisconsin Medical License eligible, Board certified or boardeligible in Diagnostic Radiology, Pediatric Radiology subspecialty.CAQ eligible or CAQ certified in Pediatric Radiology. PROFESSOR (CHS)(D01NN) or ASSOC PROFESSOR (CHS)(D02NN) or ASSTPROFESSOR (CHS)(D03NN) or CLINICAL PROFESSOR(D51NN) or CLINICALASSOC PROF(D52NN) or CLINICAL ASST PROF(D53NN)last_img read more

Matchmaker, make me a match

first_img Related Sure, your heart thumps, but let’s look at what’s happening physically and psychologically When love and science double date The dating scene can be overwhelming and unsettling, including for Ivy League men and women who have achieved success in their professional lives but not in their romantic lives.Yet they should fear not. Capitalism is on the case.Dating companies and matchmakers that cater mostly to highly educated and proficient singles have seized on this selective market. In advance of Valentine’s Day, the Gazette contacted three dating companies that run classified personals in Harvard Magazine and other alumni publications to get the lowdown on Ivy Leaguers’ romantic needs, and the efforts to serve them.Ryan Law, founder of BluesMatch, a company based in London that matches Oxford, Cambridge, and Ivy League graduates, said it makes sense that as people experience search fatigue from broad, impersonal online dating pools, they’re drawn to sites that narrow the field by matching users’ interests or backgrounds.“People get tired of using Tinder or Match because there are too many people,” said Law during a Skype chat from London. “And they often don’t have the level of conversation that someone from Oxford or the Ivy League gets excited by.”Himself an Oxford-educated geologist and managing director of a geothermal engineering firm, Law founded BluesMatch in 2001 to help himself and other Oxford or Cambridge alumni find their life partners among like-minded people. Although in the end he found his wife offline, he said companies like his meet a real need — one that has little to do with snobbery.“It’s not about elitism, it’s about commonality,” he said. “If you speak the same language, use the same points of reference, and share a similar understanding of politics and the world, it just makes a big difference.“It’s quite an aphrodisiac to go out and have a really good conversation, a really good laugh. If that’s missing …”center_img As the $2.1 billion online dating industry has grown, so have niche sites that match people according to specific needs and wants. There are sites for plus-size singles, vegetarians, Star Trek enthusiasts, pet lovers, farmers, tall people, “Ugly Schmucks,” and even for people who share an STD. Sites tailored for elite or Ivy League singles are just a small part of the trend.The Ivy League sites generally offer monthly memberships for $30 or $60, and some include six-month and yearly access to the exclusive database. Others sell customized and personalized packages that are more expensive, and, according to their owners, have a higher success rate than mainstream dating sites.Barbara Black Goldfarb and Nancy Gold, who run Elegant Introductions out of Miami, are matchmakers for a clientele based in Miami and Boston. Most of their clients, said Gold, are highly educated and professionally successful, are involved in their community, appreciate the arts, and have been screened to make sure they are who they say they are. Applicants have to show proof of an Ivy League degree.The matchmakers start by meeting the clients to learn about their likes, expectations, and deal breakers. Then they seek compatible matches, introduce people to one another, and wait to see if magic happens.“Instead of going online and putting yourself out there, and being your own advocate, we are their advocates,” said Goldfarb.Discretion and confidentiality are important to anyone in the dating scene, but when it comes to love seekers who hold high-status jobs and have prestigious careers, they’re paramount, said Sandy Sternbach, who started The Right Time Consultants in 2006. Scammers, sex offenders, cheaters, and exaggerated or fake profiles abound in the online dating world. Online daters need to be careful.“My clients are extremely successful and well-known,” said Sternbach, who has more than 20 years of experience in the matchmaking industry. “They may be connected to a university or a big institution, and they need to meet people in a way that protects their reputation and doesn’t compromise their careers and integrity.”Mostly, those people yearn to find the one thing missing from their lives. And sometimes, they do. A local academic, who asked to remain anonymous, tried several Ivy League online dating sites without luck, and then, on a friend’s recommendation, hired a personal matchmaker who found seven candidates with similar values, life experiences, and career accomplishments. She met all of them, but the sparks flew only when she met one Ivy League academic. “We immediately hit it off,” she said. “It was pretty instantaneous.”After five years of dating, they got married two years ago. And they’re happy. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

Not A Gardener

first_imgBy Kathy MieleI came walking up my driveway dragging a shovel, rake and an old spackle bucket. I dropped them by the garage door then opened a bottle of water and began guzzling it.Steven came around the side of the house, the weed whacker in his hands. “Did you have fun at the garden?” he asked.This year I’d decided to join the towns’ community garden. I’d taken a small bed that I’d planned on filling with beefsteak tomatoes and red and green peppers. It wasn’t going to be anything fancy, just a small little garden where I’d tend my vegetables. I pictured myself wearing a wide-brimmed straw hat, holding a pretty little basket in the crook of my arm that I’d fill weekly with my delicious vegetables.That dream was now gone as I now looked down at my mud caked pants and sneakers. I was thinking about throwing them out because they were so filthy. I didn’t even want them in my washing machine. “I think I just found out I’m not much of a gardener.” I admitted. I had an itch on my nose that I was afraid to scratch because my hands were so dirty. “That garden is solid clay!” I complained. “It’s been rototilled twice and I can barely get a shovel through the dirt!”I pointed to the clay caked shovel to prove my point. “Most of the other gardeners have had their plants in for over a week!” I whined. I gave up on worrying about getting dirt on my face and scratched my itchy nose.“Do you want me to go over with you and help you get the plants in?” Steven asked.“Oh I got the plants in.” I said finishing off the bottle of water. I was still thirsty and realized I was seriously thinking about turning on the garden hose that was laying by the garage for another drink.“Well that’s good news!” Steven said as he took the shovel and began tapping it against the driveway trying to knock off some of the clay before putting it away.“I guess so.” I said. “I planted the tomatoes first. But by the time I finished planting the pepper plants I looked back at the tomato plants and they were already wilting!” I complained.“That happens sometimes.” Steven said. “Some plants get shocked when you first put them in. They should be fine.” I could tell he was trying to make me feel better.“Well I’m setting my alarm early tomorrow to go check on them.” I said.“Wow, that’s dedicated.” He sounded impressed.“Dedicated?” I looked at him a bit confused. “I’m just trying to get there before all the other gardeners show up. This way if my plants are dead I can rip them out before any of them see and plant some new ones!”last_img read more

Mardi Gras pickleball tournament held in Red Bluff

first_imgRed Bluff >> Betsy Palubeski hosted the first Mardi Gras Pickleball Tournament Feb. 11 at the Lincoln Street tennis courts. Sixteen players participated and LeRoy Weighall was the tournament director.The winning team was made up of Cathy D’Ulisse, Diane Tucci, Kateland Weighall and Rita Weighall.Other players included Jody Johnson, Nora Sabhlok, Carmel Growney, Missy Dominick, Chelsea Kingston, Kathleen Farren, Betsy Palubeski, Mary Jacobson, Betty Lasley, Sherrie Weigle, Michele Gunsauls …last_img

Thinking of the farm as a business

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Corn and bean basis has remained strong, or even slightly improved for April delivery, even with the recent futures rally. This likely indicates limited farmer selling and/or good demand. It’s been a while since we’ve seen this type of market situation, and it suggests potentially higher prices going forward.I expect the 2018 marketing year to be much different than 2017, but I have my plan in place ready to take advantage of opportunities that become available. In order to do this effectively, it’s imperative to know my breakeven price. Several Midwest universities have published their corn and bean breakeven cost structures for various farmers across the Midwest. While I may disagree with a few line items on their budgets, their overall numbers are values that I think is a reasonable level for the average farmer to use as a goal for their own budgets. Thinking of the farm as a businessI suggest that farmers look at their farm operation as a large company with multiple profit centers working to a common goal. Each profit center must “pull its own weight” without drawing profits from other divisions. Successful farmers understand each profit center independently and how it maximizes profit for the farm operation.There are four large divisions (some with smaller subsets) that I look at:Land ownershipCustom machine operationsGrain storage facilityFarmer. Land ownershipSince farmers are naturally passionate about working the land, this is where I see the most “cheating.” I ask all my clients, “Are you paying yourself a fair market rental price for use of your own land?” In theory, some farmers could spend all of their time on the beach, while renting out all of their farmland. Considering the typical farmer’s mentality, few think like this, but they should. The most successful operations understand the profit from land ownership comes from a long-term investment.This long-term investment could have been made when the land was purchased 20 years ago at cheaper values or recently at higher prices. Either way there is a fair market rental price based upon the local market conditions for every farm out there. From the start of budget preparations this rental value needs to be calculated to understand the possible guaranteed income a farmer is giving up in order to actually farm their own landFarmers frequently tell me that if they figured the fair market rental prices for land they have owned for 20 years that they won’t make a profit on all the other land that they rent. If so, this might indicate other divisions within their operation are not as efficient as they should be. Or it could simply mean the farmer might be paying too much for the additional rented ground.Sometimes farmers say they need to adjust prices based upon entire farms instead of field by field. While there are two schools of thought on this subject, I tend to think each farm, not field, should stand on its own. There will always be a field or two that aren’t necessarily profitable within a group of fields rented from each landowner, but it can be justified as long as that entire farm makes up for those few loser fields. However, the balance of the other farms in the operation shouldn’t subsidize any other farm in any operation in my opinion. Custom operationsProfitable farmers also understand the cost of every piece of equipment. Most mid-sized farmers today could have over $1 million invested in equipment, so it’s important to be as efficient as possible. Following are questions that should be asked of every piece of equipment (i.e. planter, combine, sprayer, semi, tractor, etc.)What is the local custom rate for each piece of equipment you need if hired done?What is the yearly maintenance cost for each piece of equipment needed (e.g. 5 year avg)?What are the yearly depreciation costs?Is there profit potential in owning equipment and doing custom hire work?Is owning, renting, leasing or hiring another farmer a better option? Bankers always include depreciation in their budget estimates, but farmers tend to disregard it because it’s not an actual cash expense each year. I too have always hated this line item because it doesn’t reflect anything tangible and is too easy to “fudge.”Often farmers will “mine” the equity on their equipment by not paying themselves enough per acre to use it and replace it. This may be fine for a short time, but years later replacing equipment becomes too expensive, potentially leaving the farmer in a difficult position down the road. This is where the depreciation that should have been budgeted in each year catches up with a farmer.That’s why I prefer to use custom rates in my budget instead of loans, depreciation, repairs, fuel and labor independently. Putting more acres on machines doesn’t usually decrease one’s overall cost per acre much, if all these expenses are included the costs are still about the same. For example, think of two identical used combines except one has 1,000 more hours on it. No one would value those two combines at the same price because there is always a cost to using equipment beyond just fuel and labor.When a farmer tells me they can’t make a profit using university breakeven levels using custom equipment rates, I’m concerned. Without a significant rally, this farmer will have a difficult time being profitable. Usually farmers in this situation are paying very high land rents are likely not accounting for true equipment costs. Although I have seen situations where a small farmers might not have enough acres to warrant a purchase of some or maybe even all of their equipment. Grain storageGrain storage is a profit center many producers use incorrectly. Most farmers store non-contracted grain, hoping for a market rally, because storing unpriced grain at their local elevator means hefty charges. Between storing unpriced grain at home for “free” or storing it at an elevator for a charge, it can make a little sense I guess.However, many farmers are missing out on all of the profitable benefits of storing grain at home while selling forward to take advantage of carry and basis appreciation. By considering on-farm grain storage as a separate cost center, analyzing the expense to build new storage becomes a practical one. One just needs to analyze the premiums received from carry and basis optimization against the expense of building new bins. Almost every time I walk a client through the numbers, having on-farm grain storage is a profitable venture. Actually, I find grain storage can have the best return on investment above every other investment in a farm operation. FarmerThe “farmer” is the part of you that makes management decisions each year. It’s similar to a CEO position with strategic decisions that need to be made on crop inputs and farm operations:Fertilizer — What kind? How much? When to apply?Chemicals — What kind? How much? When to apply?Seed/agronomy — How much corn vs. beans? On which fields? Which brands/hybrids/traits?Insurance — How much? What program?Hired help — How much? Where do I find these people? How much to pay?Marketing — When to sell. Was that a profitable price? What I too greedy in my goal?Strategic planning — Should I rent or buy more ground? Should I drop a low producing field?There are so many decisions for farmers to make it can sometimes be overwhelming. To help in budgeting, I ask my clients: “How much do you want to make on each acre they farm?” Each farm is different and has its own challenges, but these questions should be answered by not only the big established family farms but also the small young farmers renting all of their land. Putting it together Finally, the farmer puts all of these profit centers together to form a budget (or business plan, but farmers don’t usually call it that). Then a marketing plan can be developed to try and ensure the farm is profitable. If each profit center is optimized, the biggest opportunities for the farm operation can be achieved.Some may think all of this is just part of being a farmer, but breaking up the divisions/profit centers independently and then optimizing each one can help maximize profits. Perhaps there is a weak division/profit center that was only exposed after doing the analysis. Farmers can then take steps to maximize each area. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

Solar Thermal Is Really, Really Dead

first_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Back in early 2012, in an article called “Solar Thermal Is Dead,” I announced that “it’s now cheaper to heat water with a photovoltaic array than solar thermal collectors.”Now that almost three years have passed, it’s worth revisiting the topic. In the years since that article was written, the cost to install a photovoltaic (PV) system has dropped significantly. Moreover, I’ve come across monitoring data that allow for a more accurate estimate of the amount of electricity needed to heat water with electric resistance elements or a heat pump.First, I’ll present my assumptions.In my earlier article, I estimated that a residential solar thermal system with two 4′ by 8′ collectors and a solar storage tank with a capacity in the range of 80 to 120 gallons costs between $8,000 to $10,000 to install. I stand by that estimate.Of course, some contractors can beat this price, while others will charge significantly more. (In a recent comment posted on GBA, an Ohio-based solar contractor named Daniel Young estimated that the solar thermal system I describe would cost $16,250.) For the purposes of the comparisons made in this article, I’ll assume that the installed cost of a residential solar thermal system is $9,000.My calculations are based on a PV system cost of $3.74/watt. The figure comes from a the “Solar Market Insight Report 2014 Q2” published by the Solar Energy Industries Association.Some GBA readers have received quotes of $3.50/watt for a PV system, while others are still paying $4.00/watt or more. One thing’s for sure: prices for PV are still dropping.The price comparisons made in this article do not include any incentives, rebates, or tax credits.The easiest way to figure out how many kWh will be produced each year by a PV system is to use a free online… center_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more

The Mike Gundy Press Conference Bingo Card

first_imgHere it is, the long-awaited Mike Gundy Bingo card. Carson Cunningham and Kyle Porter came up with most of the phrases with some assists from PFB contributors (most notably Kyle Cox) and a few folks on Twitter (thank you!)Hope you enjoy playing along during Mike Gundy pressers for the rest of the year.gundy-bingoIf you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img

MiraCosta College waives tuition for all firsttime fulltime students

first_img KUSI Newsroom MiraCosta College waives tuition for all first-time, full-time students KUSI Newsroom, OCEANSIDE (KUSI) – MiraCosta College announced Monday that tuition will be fully waived for first-time full-time students as part of the MiraCosta Promise program.The promise program is funded by private donations to the MiraCosta College Foundation and a variety of state and local entities. Along with the waiving of tuition, students who graduated from a high school within the community college’s district — MiraCosta serves coastal North San Diego County through its main campus in Oceanside, at 1 Barnard Drive, and San Elijo campus in Cardiff-by-the-Sea –can receive up to $1,000 for textbooks and other supplies if eligible.“Promise aims to remove a significant hurdle for college-bound students; tuition, mandatory fees and textbook costs for eligible full-time students,” said MiraCosta Superintendent and President Sunita Cooke. “Promise is boosting transfer and certificate attainment rates, improving academic performance and expanding higher education access to underserved populations.”MiraCosta waived tuition for nearly 500 students for the 2017-18 school year, the first year of the Promise program, according to the college. MiraCosta aims to cover two full years of tuition and fees for qualifying students in the near future. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: August 20, 2018 August 20, 2018last_img read more