Another chance for public to discuss 2010 budget

first_imgThe City will be holding another public consultation on the 2010 budget on Monday.Two weeks ago, City Councilors and staff held a meeting on the capital budget. The upcoming session will be on the operating budget, which is expected to raise property taxes by as much as 3 per cent this year. – Advertisement -It will be an opportunity for community members to ask questions and voice concerns. The meeting will be held on Monday, March 1, at 5:00p.m. at City Hall on 100th Street. By Energeticcity.ca stafflast_img

Why Facebook is still your best friend

first_imgTransitioning from high school to college can be stressful for some students and to maintain connections with pre-college friends and form new relationships, Facebook can still be your best friend. A new research led by Indian-origin researchers reveals that Facebook can help college students maintain relationships with high-school friends and assist them in creating new friendships. The study, published in the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, shows that when it comes to making new friends, those with higher confidence in their social skills have less to gain from relying on Facebook, while people with lower confidence in their social skills have more to gain from the social media platform. “Transitioning from high school to college can be stressful for many students. To help them adjust to life in college, it is critical for them to maintain connections with pre-college friends and to form new relationships,” said the Associate Professor at Binghamton University in the US. For the study, the researchers focused on first semester college students by asking undergraduate college students, mostly sophomores, about their experiences with different channels used to maintain and grow relationships. Accounting for Facebook’s effect on relationships versus the impact of more traditional media face-to-face interaction, phone calls, etc., researchers also incorporated how each student’s social self-efficacy like confidence in their social skills affected the use of both Facebook and traditional media to build and maintain relationships. In terms of how “best” to use Facebook to maintain and build new relationships, some of the findings include; Facebook can compensate for the lower use of traditional media to maintain relationships with close friends from high school. According to researchers, Facebook works best when supplementing traditional media when it comes to making new college friends, students with high self-efficacy have more to gain from prioritising traditional media over Facebook when making new college friends. And students with low self-efficacy have more to gain from prioritising Facebook use over traditional media when making new college friends. “New college students often stress about trying to maintain their high school friendships while struggling to develop new ones.last_img read more

Time to move on Ceremony marks land deal for Lubicon Lake First

first_imgLITTLE BUFFALO, Alta. — A ceremony in northern Alberta Tuesday marked the end to a decades-long fight for recognition that attracted international attention to the poverty of the Lubicon Lake First Nation.The Lubicon were missed in treaty negotiations in the late 1800s and fought for 40 years for a land settlement that would bring much-needed housing, better education and health care.Dignitaries from the federal and Alberta government were in Little Buffalo on Tuesday as Chief Billy-Joe Laboucan officially signed off on the deal in front of smiling band members who packed the community’s gym and applauded long and loud.“It’s only appropriate that we’re here in Little Buffalo school because (what) we’re doing here today impacts all of these students, all of the children that are going to school here, all of the children that have yet to be born,” Laboucan said.The Lubicon gained a global stage when they held a protest at the Calgary Olympics in 1988 and blockaded roads into the disputed area to draw attention to their plight. A United Nations committee and Amnesty International criticized Canada for its treatment of the First Nation.Laboucan said people still talk about past disputes and things that happened in the community.“That’s over. It’s time to move on and we have moved on.” he said. “I thank the people of Lubicon for being able to do that.”After they were missed by British officials negotiating Treaty 8, the Lubicon spent decades in limbo, even after the federal government agreed in 1939 that they deserved title to their land.The issue stagnated until the 1970s when oil and gas companies began carving through local traplines. By then, the Lubicon were so poor that diseases such as tuberculosis were a problem.The deal includes about 245 square kilometres of land and $113 million to rebuild Little Buffalo.Carolyn Bennett, federal minister of Crown-Indigenous relations, said no agreement can fully right the wrongs the Lubicon faced, but it is important to start making amends.“Some may say that this has been a long time coming. That would be a gross understatement,” she said Tuesday. “This is not about patience. This is about the incredible persistence of your people to have your rights recognized and implemented.”Bennett said the Lubicons’ fight awakened Canadians — and others — to the responsibility of recognizing inherent and treaty rights.“Your fight became almost a talisman of what the fight for Indigenous rights was and meant, not only to Canada, but to the world.”Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said she remembers learning about the Lubicon when she was still a child.“I thought about how kids from Lubicon Lake my own age must have felt knowing … that such a basic and obvious justice had been denied them and their parents, and their grandparents, and so many who came before them.”One woman said after the ceremony that she had moved away for a few years when she was younger because conditions were so bad. She said she was living in a house that had black mould which made her baby sick.But things have been improving in the last five years, she said, adding that she is grateful for the deal, even though she having trouble letting it sink in after so many years.Laboucan said in an earlier interview that the real work is just beginning. The settlement money is already tagged for essentials such as decent housing, a new school and an elders care facility.  Laboucan credited former chief Bernard Ominayak for his advocacy that let companies know the Lubicon had an interest in the land and discouraged them from working there.It was Ominayak who led the protest at the 1988 Winter Games.“If that hadn’t been the case, we wouldn’t be here,” said Laboucan. “A lot of credit has to go to previous chief Bernard Ominayak and council, and all the chiefs before him.”Ominayak did not appear to be at Tuesday’s signing.— Follow Bob Weber @row1960 on TwitterBob Weber, The Canadian Presslast_img read more