2016 World Press Freedom Index ­– leaders paranoid about journalists

first_imgNews Organisation Most of the movement in the World Press Freedom Index unveiled today by Reporters Without Borders is indicative of a climate of fear and tension combined with increasing control over newsrooms by governments and private-sector interests. Reports and statistics Reports and statistics RSF_en center_img Help by sharing this information April 20, 2016 – Updated on May 1, 2016 2016 World Press Freedom Index ­– leaders paranoid about journalists Читать по-русски / Read in RussianThe 2016 World Press Freedom Index reflects the intensity of the attacks on journalistic freedom and independence by governments, ideologies and private-sector interests during the past year. 180countries rankedaccording to the freedom allowed to journalistsSeen as a benchmark throughout the world, the Index ranks 180 countries according to the freedom allowed journalists. It also includes indicators of the level of media freedom violations in each region. These show that Europe (with 19.8 points) still has the freest media, followed distantly by Africa (36.9), which for the first time overtook the Americas (37.1), a region where violence against journalists is on the rise. Asia (43.8) and Eastern Europe/Central Asia (48.4) follow, while North Africa/Middle East (50.8) is still the region where journalists are most subjected to constraints of every kind.Three north European countries head the rankings. They are Finland (ranked 1st, the position it has held since 2010), Netherlands (2nd, up 2 places) and Norway (3rd, down 1). The countries that rose most in the Index include Tunisia (96th, up 30), thanks to a decline in violence and legal proceedings, and Ukraine (107th, up 22), where the conflict in the east of the country abated.The countries that fell farthest include Poland (47th, down 29), where the ultra-conservative government seized control of the public media, and (much farther down) Tajikistan, which plunged 34 places to 150th as a result of the regime’s growing authoritarianism. The Sultanate of Brunei (155th, down 34) suffered a similar fall because gradual introduction of the Sharia and threats of blasphemy charges have fuelled self-censorship. Burundi (156th, down 11) fell because of the violence against journalists resulting from President Pierre Nkurunziza’s contested reelection for a third term. The same “infernal trio” are in the last three positions: Turkmenistan (178th), North Korea (179th) and Eritrea (180th).“It is unfortunately clear that many of the world’s leaders are developing a form of paranoia about legitimate journalism,”RSF secretary-general Christophe Deloire“The climate of fear results in a growing aversion to debate and pluralism, a clampdown on the media by ever more authoritarian and oppressive governments, and reporting in the privately-owned media that is increasingly shaped by personal interests. Journalism worthy of the name must be defended against the increase in propaganda and media content that is made to order or sponsored by vested interests. Guaranteeing the public’s right to independent and reliable news and information is essential if humankind’s problems, both local and global, are to be solved.”Published annually by RSF since 2002, the World Press Freedom Index is an important advocacy tool based on the principle of emulation between states. Because it is now so well known, its influence over the media, governments and international organizations is growing.The Index is based on an evaluation of media freedom that measures pluralism, media independence, the quality of the legal framework and the safety of journalists in 180 countries. It is compiled by means of a questionnaire in 20 languages that is completed by experts all over the world. This qualitative analysis is combined with quantitative data on abuses and acts of violence against journalists during the period evaluated.The Index is not an indicator of the quality of the journalism in each country, nor does it rank public policies even if governments obviously have a major impact on their country’s ranking.Find out moreA sophisticated methodologyTo compile the Index, a sophisticated and rigorous methodology is used. It is based on scores calculated from a series of indicators.A general declineThe global indicator and the regional indicators show that there has been a deep and disturbing decline in respect for media freedom throughout the world.Focus on the regionsAfrica’s journalists, victims of terrorism, armed conflict and election crisesReporting constrained by terror in the Middle East and North AfricaJournalism under the gun and club in the AmericasA nice postcard from the Pacific, but not AsiaAnother turn of the screw in the post-Soviet regionEurope threatened by demons, its own and the world’s Related documents Всемирный Индекс свободы прессы 2016PDF – 108.11 KB last_img read more

How COVID-19 Financial Struggles Could Eventually Help Drive Homeownership

first_imgSign up for DS News Daily Home / Daily Dose / How COVID-19 Financial Struggles Could Eventually Help Drive Homeownership Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago How COVID-19 Financial Struggles Could Eventually Help Drive Homeownership January 28, 2021 990 Views Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles 2021-01-28 Christina Hughes Babb  Print This Post About Author: Christina Hughes Babb The COVID-19 pandemic has forced countless changes in every sector, and the home shopping environment is no exception. For some first-time homebuyers, many of whom had to move back into the family home during the crisis, there could be a silver lining, according to a study by realtor.com.Returning home for a period of time, rent-free, could mean a real opportunity to save for a down payment on a home.Saving for a down payment is one of the biggest barriers to homeownership, according to a press release from realtor.com. “For the record number of young adults who moved back home during the pandemic fortunate to still have a job, homeownership may be more attainable than they think.”For someone paying the U.S. median one-bedroom rent of $1,533, it would take 11 months to save $17,000, a 5% down payment for a $340,000 home, the median-priced home in the U.S., according to realtor.com’s analysis of listing and rental data for the U.S. and the nation’s 20 largest metros in December 2020.”Although many members of the millennial and Gen Z generations were forced to move home because they lost their jobs in 2020, others chose to forgo their rental because they had the opportunity to work remotely and preferred to wait out the pandemic with family,” said realtor.com Chief Economist Danielle Hale. “For those who have been able to channel their would-be rent into savings, the pandemic’s silver lining could be becoming a homeowner sooner than they otherwise would have.”At a local level, in Chicago, for example, based on the median rent for a one-bedroom apartment of $1,521, it would take 11 months to save $16,350, a 5% down payment on the median list price home of $327,000.  At the opposite end of the spectrum, in Los Angeles, where the median list price for a home is just under $1 million and the median one-bedroom rent is $2,250, it would take 22 months to save for a 5% down payment of $50,000. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: Honoring Excellence Among Mortgage Legal Professionals Next: FHFA’s Foreclosure Prevention and Refinance Activity Report Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

Bristol man charged for allegedly causing serious injury crash

first_img Twitter Google+ Previous articleSouth Bend Cubs to host job fair on FridayNext articleSeveral Indiana State Police troopers converge on semi for search Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. IndianaLocalNews By Jon Zimney – April 19, 2021 0 16 Pinterest Twitter Pinterest Google+ Facebook (Photo supplied/Elkhart County Jail) A Bristol man accused of leading police on a chase from Michigan to Indiana that ended in a crash with his passenger receiving serious injuries has been charged.It was back in November when Gary Leiting Jr., 26, allegedly led police on a chase from Cass County into Elkhart County in a pick-up truck that was believed to have been stolen.The pursuit ended with a crash near Ash Road and County Road 2.The female passenger in the truck has since undergone several medical procedures and has multiple spinal fractures and may be permanently paralyzed.Leiting now faces resisting charges and weapons-related counts.Read more about the case in The Elkhart Truth. WhatsApp WhatsApp Bristol man charged for allegedly causing serious injury crash Facebooklast_img read more

Panelists stress value of Holocaust accounts

first_imgExperts discussed the significance and incomprehensibility of the horrors of the Holocaust  in modern day studies Thursday in Doheny Memorial Library.History · Panelist Stephen Smith discusses the value of learning from the stories of Holocaust survivors Thursday in the Doheny Memorial Library. – Ralf Cheung | Daily TrojanThe panel discussion, hosted by the USC Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study and the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute was moderated by the Norman Lear Professor of Entertainment, Media and Society in Annenberg Martin Kaplan.The time of the panel was particularly appropriate as Sunday night begins the 24-hour period of Yom HaShoah, the day each year among Jewish people remember the Holocaust.The panel elaborated on the prevailing relevancy of the Holocaust 68 years later.“The idea now behind genocide studies isn’t just descriptive, but prescriptive,” Dean of Religious Life Varun Soni said. “The enormity of what happened during the Holocaust — the chilling efficiency, the numbers involved — allows it to be an important template and window to understand genocide broadly conceived.”The panelists agreed that the survivor testimonies are vital to the way we understand the Shoah and all its aspects. To date, the Shoah Foundation has collected nearly 52,000 survivor testimonies.Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education Executive Director Stephen D. Smith emphasized the value of each individual’s story.“What you notice when you look at them one at a time is that they’re all different,” Smith said. “So, we’re all quite eager to find, ‘What’s the trope here? What’s the single narrative that we’re going to feel comfortable living with the next few hundred years?’ And the answer is, if we do find one, it’s going to be the wrong one, because the answer is found in the granularity of the individualities.”One of the most captivating moments of the panel discussion revolved around the Shoah as not just a collection of historical narratives but one that is living.“The Holocaust is also about us. It’s not just that we can essentialize as something evil that isn’t human, that isn’t relevant, that isn’t about us,” Soni said. “Storytelling gives us a powerful window to understand the Holocaust from the perspective of the victims, but I also think that we have the opportunity to tell new stories about ourselves and about the world.”Soni compared the importance of learning history to the efforts being made by students on campus to understand modern-day issues.“What I see on our college campus is students who are telling stories of reconciliation and engagement,” Soni said. “I’ve seen students who advocate for Israel and for Palestine come together and think constructively about how they can work together on certain issues.”Soni said the lessons learned from telling the stories of individuals in the Holocaust could influence the way people choose to tell the stories about humanity today.“I think this is an incredible opportunity for students, for the university in a global diasporic context, to really tell new stories about ourselves — to tell new stories about the world,” Soni said. “It’s not just stories from a historical perspective, but the way we tell stories about ourselves today.”Luke Phillips, a freshman majoring in international relations and history, said the event highlighted the importance of viewing the Holocaust from a different moral and narrative perspective.“The main reason I came here was to get a different moral version than what I’ve heard from mass media,” Phillips said. “It brings to my mind the question of [whether this] is the greatest evil ever perpetrated, objectively, or is this really a thing of the times — that every age has its own atrocities?”last_img read more

Another look at 20 years of fertilizer recommendations

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest There are likely as many varied opinions on the validity and the accuracy of the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations as there are farms and soil types. No matter what that opinion may be from field to field, it is hard to deny that the document has had an incredible impact on crop production in Ohio.“The Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations for corn, soybeans, wheat, and alfalfa were first published in 1995,” said Steve Culman, assistant professor of soil fertility at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center and state Extension specialist in soil fertility. “It was the culmination of 40 years of calibrated field studies. They calibrated fertilizer rates with agronomic response. The idea is that it is a self-contained document that looks at the three macronutrients in our agronomic crops. For phosphorus and potassium it looks at soil test levels and the probability of seeing a yield response. This is a precursor to the 4 Rs in many ways. There is also some discussion of some secondary macronutrients and micronutrients as well.”The information from the recommendations has undoubtedly saved millions of dollars in on-farm fertilizer expenditures, helped contribute to increased yields, and had tremendous environmental benefits, but Culman knows there is still plenty of room for improvement for the 20-year-old document.“Since then, many things have changed in agriculture. We grow crops very differently than we did 20 years ago. We grow soybeans differently and genetics are different,” he said. “This was before glyphosate resistance and there is a lot more no-till now which changes how nutrients are cycled in soils. With the backdrop of water quality issues in the state today there is a lot of justification in re-looking at this and a lot of interest in revising things a little. Certain soil types are going to require more or less fertility  — not two or three times more or less — but we are looking at this with an open mind. We are entertaining the possibility that these recommendations may have been too high or too low.”With funding from the Ohio Soybean Council and soybean checkoff, the massive undertaking really got started in 2014.“Checkoff funding is really important for these kinds of projects because federal dollars are not used for regional research like this,” Culman said. “Last year we started our first field season looking at phosphorus and potassium in soybeans and that is continuing this year. We are looking at nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in corn and wheat too.”The research will result in a new updated document and recommendations within a few years.“We need good information and our process needs to be transparent. Several years from now we will have 50 and 100 site years per crop and nutrient to look at. That is the goal,” he said. “We are trying to collect as much data as we can in the next few years and see what it means and extract as much information from that as possible. My timeline for an official revision would be in three to five years. It may be broken down by state and even region, so it may not be tri-state any more. I am in contact with the state specialists at Michigan State and Purdue to see what we are going to do moving forward.” The success of the project is largely dependent on the cooperation from farmers and private agribusinesses.“The original was done primarily on OSU research farms over 30 or 40 years. We do not have that luxury now. The success of this project is incredibly reliant on farmers buying into this and wanting to be part of the solution for better nutrient management,” Culman said. “We are branching out to work with not only Extension researchers, but also people in the industry like crop consultants, ag retailers, co-op agronomists, and CCAs. The devil is in all the details of coordinating that. There are a lot of moving parts to this.”This year the field trial numbers will be increasing as the research continues.“We have more than 20 growers putting trials out. Last year we had 10. The majority of the folks we are working with will be putting in trials this fall when the majority of fertilizer is applied, though there are a few sites going in this summer,” Culman said. “We have around 30 different OSU sites going in this year as well. We are working with a dozen or so private consultants and if others are interested in working with us, we are more than happy to add more. We are getting the wrinkles ironed out, but we have money in the budget to put out a lot of different sites. We are trying to scale up and make farmers aware that we are running fertilizer trials. We are appreciative of the growers who are working with us now and hope to get more. We are very flexible about the size of the plots.”To get relevant results, Culman is looking for adequate representation of the soil types in the state.“We are working at getting a good representation of the variability that is out there in the state. There are sites on research farms and small plot work on private land. It is a mix of small and large plots but it is all replicated to get sound data,” Culman said. “We are especially interested in low testing soils. If you are just renting new ground where the fertility has been neglected — those sites are hard to come by. The research is really looking at low testing N, P and K fields. There are a lot of well-managed, productive fields already. We are looking for as diverse of a sample as we can get.“For a field plot, we look at a pre-season soil sample, then mid-season tissue test, yield, and nutrient content in the grain for an elemental analysis. You scale the test strips to the size of your equipment. The farmer can pick the nutrients they want to look at. So for soybeans and phosphorus, for example, where they use a spinner spreader, they would have a strip of phosphorus and an unfertilized strip. That will be replicated three times. Then we do a mid-season tissue sample at flowering and then look at yields and get some of the grain for analysis. A lot of the farmers want to do it themselves and we can work with them to do it as well.”The participants get to see all of the results for their plots and receive an honorarium for their participation and cooperation.“It is a commitment of time, but we are flexible and it is not a large time commitment. All the data is anonymous and all the data from the individual’s farm will be given to them. We are just trying to see what is out there,” he said. “It does cost a little bit of time but we hopefully pay for that. And really, the only way you are going to know what is happening with your fertility is if you conduct a trial.  In terms of smart economics, this can really help with one of the main things you are spending money on. You don’t want too much fertilizer out there but we don’t want too little either.”The individual results will be combined for the eventual recommendations.“We envision the next generation of recommendations to include digital media like apps or software to generate fertility recommendations based on your soil test values. We see this as a more fluid document that can be revised as we learn more. An electronic resource is more conducive to those kinds of changes,” Culman said. “The data will be published and available so farmers can have it to make their own decisions. Keeping this process open and transparent will help dispel some myths about nutrient management.”With the incredible focus on nutrient management and water quality issues in Ohio in recent years, the reassessment of fertility recommendations takes on even broader implications than 20 years ago, particularly for phosphorus.“We can either be proactive about this or sit on our hands and let this be regulated. Most people I have talked to are reserving judgment about whether the current phosphorus recommendations are too high or too low,” Culman said. “We know there are problem areas out there and that there are all kinds of approaches. This is primarily a document focused on rate, but maybe rate is not the most important part of improving water quality. We don’t know that yet.”In the end, no fertility recommendation is going to be perfect for every field every year, but Culman thinks that significant improvements can be made that will lead to improved nutrient management on farms in the future.“There are some people who say the Tri-State is too high, some say it is too low and some that think it is right on. We want to get growers the best possible information to manage their farms and give them the confidence that our information is reliable. That is what we want to do,” he said. “We want to keep folks that are selling fertilizer honest in terms of their recommendations. You need current information to make the best decisions and we are just hoping to make this a transparent process and provide the best possible recommendations. And, better nutrient management is ultimately going to reduce runoff and provide more nutrient use efficiency and better profitability.  There will never be 100% certainty, but we are hoping to get a lot better information to help growers make decisions.”For more information, contact Culman at [email protected] or (330) 263-3787. For much more on the soybean checkoff, visit the Soybean Rewards web page at http://www.soyohio.org/council/for-ohio-farmers/soybean-rewards/. Also, see the related video at ocj.com by searching for keywords “Culman fertility.”last_img read more

With some major exceptions, new deal has old NAFTA feel

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Ty Higgins, Ohio Ag NetRight before a deadline set by President Trump, the U.S. and Canada came to an agreement on the framework for an updated North American Free Trade Agreement, called the US-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). It’s a shot in the arm for American agriculture, which has been struggling as trade disputes with U.S. trading partners dragged on.“It’s the first step in really getting us from this summer of disruption in global trade and getting us back to a fall of business resumption and that will bring stability in North American markets,” said Daniel Ujczo, International Trade and Customs Lawyer with Dickinson-Wright in Columbus. “I think over the next 60 days we will start to see steel and aluminum tariffs lifted which will end the retaliation in Mexico. That will be good news for the agriculture community, who will not have to worry so much about losing those customers not only in Mexico, but throughout the Americas.”While it’s good news, he says there’s still significant work to do, including getting the agreement through Congress. He says timing forced the U.S. and Canada to come to an agreement.“The clock was critical here,” Ujczo said. “At the end of the day that clock was being driven by the fact that we are seeing a transition of power in Mexico with a new President taking office on Dec. 1. He made is real clear that he did not want to reopen a deal with the United States and so the whole goal is to get this new deal signed before he took office.”Ujczo says the economies of all three countries are very intertwined with each other because of the original NAFTA deal. That meant coming away with no updated agreement would have made things much more difficult.“Trade would continue in North America, even if there was no framework, but it would continue in a very haphazard way,” Ujczo said. “There would always be the threat of tariffs, threats of the whims of whoever might be in the White House, Mexico City or Ottawa and there could have been drastic consequences if we might not have reached a deal. I think it might have even been problematic if we only went forward with a deal with Mexico. That became clear this past week. Congress, as important as they saw the idea of locking down a deal with Mexico, is that they wanted to make sure Canada was part of it.”Canada and the U.S. both made significant concessions to come to an agreement. Canada is ending its Class 7 milk system and allowing U.S. dairy farmers more access to the Canadian market. Overall, Ujczo says it looks like an improved deal for the United States.“Half of the old NAFTA looks like it’s getting a fresh coat of paint, looking like a modernized trade deal and the other half of this agreement is getting some new fixtures and upgrades,” Ujczo said. “We are going to see some things with technology and customs and border issues that will make it easier for companies and even farmers that ship good across the border. That is an upgrade. But we also saw the President knock down some walls with dairy being at the top of the list with Canada, which made some significant concessions on dairy going farther than they were willing to go in other past trade deals like the Trans Pacific Partnership.”The new United States, Mexico, Canada Agreement is now on its way to each respective government for approval. For the U.S., that isn’t expected to happen until after the November elections.last_img read more

Rain or Shine dumps Magnolia for 3rd straight win

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next MOST READ Raymond Almazan vs Ian Sangalang. PBA IMAGESRain or Shine raced to the top four of the standings after brushing off league-leader Magnolia, 101-95, in the PBA Philippine Cup Saturday at Calasiao Sports Complex.The Elasto Painters are all alone at the no. 4 spot of with a 5-3 card while the Hotshots absorbed their second straight loss to drop to third seed at 6-3.ADVERTISEMENT 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:33Leo Austria, SMB wary of ‘more experienced’ Hotshots ahead of PBA Finals rematch00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Rain or Shine, which never trailed for the full 48 minutes, asserted its dominance as early as the second quarter going on a 16-4 run to end the first half with a 47-35 lead. Ed Daquioag gave the Elasto Painters their biggest lead of the game at 21 points, 67-46, after he converted on a three-point play with 5:41 left in the third quarter.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutRaymond Almazan led Rain or Shine with 23 points, six rebounds, and three blocks while James Yap, one of biggest stars of the Magnolia franchise, added 13 points, five rebounds, and three assists for the Elasto Painters.Gabe Norwood and Maverick Ahanmisi both had 12 points for Rain or Shine while also grabbing a combined 15 rebounds. View comments LATEST STORIEScenter_img Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Cobb stars as La Salle halts late UP rally to stay unbeaten John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH AFP official booed out of forum Aldrech Ramos paced the Hotshots with 27 points. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoiseslast_img read more

2 days agoBarcelona coach Valverde: I don’t care about Koeman rumours

first_imgBarcelona coach Valverde: I don’t care about Koeman rumoursby Carlos Volcano2 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona coach Ernesto Valverde has dismissed rumours linking Ronald Koeman with his job.It’s emerged the Holland coach has a break clause in his contract should a club of the status of Barca express interest.The situation has immediately seen Koeman linked with a return to the Nou Camp.But Valverde says: “I do not know the situation of other coaches.”When we coach Barça, we still have a lot of rumors, but this does not mean anything to me.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img

J.T. Barrett Asked For Special Treatment During Arrest, Per TMZ

first_imgJ.T. Barrett walking off the field after losing the fiesta bowl.GLENDALE, AZ – DECEMBER 31: J.T. Barrett #16 of the Ohio State Buckeyes walks off the field after the Clemson Tigers beat the Ohio State Buckeyes 31-0 to win the 2016 PlayStation Fiesta Bowl at University of Phoenix Stadium on December 31, 2016 in Glendale, Arizona. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)Update: Here is video of the arrest, from TMZ.Earlier: TMZ has landed video of Ohio State quarterback J.T. Barrett’s citation for OVI, and according to the gossip site, it doesn’t reflect well on him. They have not released the video yet, but according to their first write-up, Barrett tells officers that he is the Buckeyes quarterback, and seems to ask for special treatment.JT Barrett Arrest Video — ‘I’M THE QB OF OHIO STATE’ … ‘There’s Nothing You Can Do?’ https://t.co/KrsK4nchdw— TMZ (@TMZ) November 12, 2015TMZ Sports obtained the dash cam footage from the October 31 incident — in which you can clearly see Barrett’s SUV pull out of a line for an upcoming DUI checkpoint … catching the attention of an officer who pulled him over. … That’s when Barrett plays the “don’t you know who I am?” card … saying, “I’m the quarterback of Ohio State … officer, there’s nothing you can do?” The officer responds, “My intention is to not take you to jail. That’s about the best I can do for you.” Once Barrett sits in the back seat of the cruiser, he begins to scream obscenities to himself … “F**K!!! F**K!!!”Perhaps this should be a surprise, but it is not a great look for Barrett, who is expected to start Saturday against Illinois after a one game suspension following his arrest. Barrett’s case was settled Tuesday, resulting in a suspension of his license and a $400 fine.last_img read more

Nick Jonas Visits Childrens Hospital At Montefiore

first_imgOn September 8, Nick Jonas met and performed for patients at Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, where he delivered the healing power of music to the kids with Musicians on Call.Nick Jonas With A Patient At Children’s Hospital at MontefioreCredit/Copyright: Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for the Children’s Hospital at MontefioreMusicians On Call brings live and recorded music to the bedsides of patients in healthcare facilities. Since 1999, they have performed for nearly half a million individuals and counting!Nick Jonas surprises patients with Musicians On Call at a visit to Children’s Hospital at MontefioreCredit/Copyright: Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for the Children’s Hospital at MontefioreNick Jonas At Children’s Hospital at Montefiore on September 8, 2014 in New York CityCredit/Copyright: Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for the Children’s Hospital at MontefioreCharlie Walk EVP of Republic Records, Nick Jonas and Pete Griffin President of Musicians on CallCredit/Copyright: Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for the Children’s Hospital at Montefiorelast_img read more