Edward Jones Invests in Local Community Financial Advisors Donate $10,000 for School Based Social…

first_imgLocal Edward Jones Financial Advisors donated $10,000 benefiting Youth First Social Work and Program services in Vanderburgh, Warrick and Posey public and private schools. David Anderson and Mike Barker of Newburgh, Jim Back, James Beard, Brittany Dennis, Chris Fleck, Melissa Nicholson, Don Patton, Jr., John Lee Smith, Tyler Vieke, Ben Waits and Jack Young of Evansville, John Ubelhor of Boonville and Steven Harding and Drew Heckert of Mt. Vernon combined efforts to meet the growing need for effective mental health and drug prevention services in schools.“Youth First social workers play a vital role in our schools,” said Jim Back. “The kids in our community have many more distractions and challenges than they did just 10 years ago. We’re proud to support Youth First social workers who are removing the barriers to learning.”“We have many community partners,” says Parri Black, Youth First President and CEO. “I’m glad the Financial Advisors at Edward Jones recognize the important role that Youth First Social Workers play in our community’s schools. We appreciate their donation.”Each year, Youth First hosts its Passport to Adventure auction to help raise critical funds to support its mission—to strengthen youth and families through evidence-based programs that prevent substance abuse, promote healthy behaviors and maximize student success. The dollars raised from this event are critical to ensure the continuation of Youth First’s free programs and services and to provide the support to youth, families and the community when needed most.Thompkins Principal Nichole Alcorn states, “I don’t even want to ever think about not having Katie Omohundro at Thompkins or not having Youth First in our building. Without Youth First we would not be able to reach the lives of the kids at the level that we are. We’d be putting band-aids on our children’s issues.”FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Mardi Gras pickleball tournament held in Red Bluff

first_imgRed Bluff >> Betsy Palubeski hosted the first Mardi Gras Pickleball Tournament Feb. 11 at the Lincoln Street tennis courts. Sixteen players participated and LeRoy Weighall was the tournament director.The winning team was made up of Cathy D’Ulisse, Diane Tucci, Kateland Weighall and Rita Weighall.Other players included Jody Johnson, Nora Sabhlok, Carmel Growney, Missy Dominick, Chelsea Kingston, Kathleen Farren, Betsy Palubeski, Mary Jacobson, Betty Lasley, Sherrie Weigle, Michele Gunsauls …last_img

Sharks’ Joe Thornton explains why his latest milestone is extra special

first_imgEDMONTON, Alberta — Whenever Joe Thornton is asked about the latest-hockey legend that he’s passed in the NHL record books, he blushes and expresses humility.It’s a scene that played out when he eclipsed Mario Lemieux in November, Gordie Howe in February and Stan Mikita in March. While every name on the ladder provides its own dose of modesty, Thornton couldn’t deny that moving into a tie with Steve Yzerman for eighth place on the NHL’s all-time assists list (1,063) on Tuesday was uniquely …last_img

Space Physics and Fables

first_imgPhysics is supposed to be the king of “hard science” because of its precise mathematics, predictability and falsifiability.  When transferred off our planet, however, it seems speculation is the order of the day. 1.  Looney magnets:  According to simple physics, the moon should have cooled long ago, because any internal heat source from its formation was much smaller than Earth’s.  Why, then, did the Apollo astronauts detect magnetism in moon rocks that scientists surmise continued millions of years after its formation?  The most commonly believed theory of planetary magnetic fields requires convection in a rotating molten layer that sets up a dynamo.  New Scientist offered an answer with a Kipling-style headline, “How the cold, dead moon stayed magnetic.”  Reporter Melissa Fellet continued, “A mystery thrown up by the Apollo moon rocks may finally have been solved. How did the moon remain magnetic tens of millions of years after its molten core stopped sloshing?”  Two groups have presented their proposals.  The first is the Washing Machine Theory.  A physicist at UCSB suggested that the moon’s faster spin as it migrated away from the Earth might have sloshed its interior like a washing machine till 2.7 billion years ago, giving it a longer life (and, presumably, whiter whites).  The second is the Impact Theory.  A French physicist thinks large impacts could have jumpstarted the magnetic field for periods of 10,000 years at a time.  An MIT physicist commented that both models offer “a way out of a pretty major conundrum,” but then he threw in another: the fact that some meteorites (presumably chips off the old asteroid) are magnetic, too.  Will the new models help explain how they became magnetized?  Only Kipling could tell. 2.  Antimatter matters:  Another long-standing conundrum in space is why our universe is composed predominantly (actually, almost entirely) of ordinary matter instead of having equal parts of matter and antimatter.  Antimatter is not some weird sci-fi writer’s invention, but simply subatomic particles with the opposite charge, like positrons, counterparts of electrons with a positive charge.  Even the designations “positive” and “negative” are arbitrary human conventions.  According to preferred cosmologies, the big bang should not have favored one over the other.  PhysOrg announced, “Physicists chip away at mystery of antimatter imbalance,” implying the mystery remains unsolved.  “The universe, they concede, has managed to keep its secret for the time being, but they’ve succeeded in significantly narrowing the number of possible answers.”  One physicist acknowledged, “It’s a huge mystery on the level of asking why the universe is here. Accepted physics can’t explain it.”  Another article on PhysOrg discussed efforts in South Korea to solve the mystery by studying neutrino interactions. These explanations are so theory-laden it is hard to tell where the theory leaves off and the data begins.  Consider this excerpt from the last PhysOrg article: The detector target is composed of 10m3 of liquid scintillator developed specifically for this experiment. The scintillator is doped with gadolinium in order to tag neutrons from inverse beta decays induced by the reactor anti-neutrinos. The target is surrounded by layers of other liquids protecting against other particles and environmental radioactivity. The target is observed by 390 immersed photomultipliers, converting the interactions into electronic signals. These signals are processed in a data acquisition system, which is ready to take data over the next five years. So if they find something in the data, how could anyone ever possibly know that it explains the universe?  What are they going to do, run a big bang and create a new universe?  Even if they did, how could they prove the same processes gave birth to ours? Regarding the moon’s magnetic field, the Washing Machine story is clearly contrived to fit uncomfortable data to an accepted belief system.  The Lucky Strike notion is even worse, but is par for the course in planetary science gaming: when confronted with a puzzle, send in an impactor to solve it.  (Try that with your next game of Checkers.)  One rule they will never, ever break is to consider a younger age for the moon. It’s time to introduce a word that will probably be used often at CEH, since it fits all the evolutionary -ologies.  The word is confabulation.  One of its meanings comes from psychiatry: “to replace the gaps left by a disorder of the memory with imaginary remembered experiences consistently believed to be true.”  Another meaning is “filling in of gaps in memory by unconstrained fabrication.”  Consider the applicable “memory” as Darwin’s naturalistic conception of the cosmos, and the fit is perfect.  The word is derived from the Latin fabula, which means “a story” or fable.  Watch for its derivations: confability, confabulate, and “con”-fability, implying a con artist’s ability to put across fables as science.(Visited 49 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

NCAA volleyball: San Sebastian rolls to 4th straight win

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Rivalry rekindled as Gargano falls in NXT Takeover: Philadelphia PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd PLAY LIST 02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Read Next 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting LATEST STORIES Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH MOST READcenter_img Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers San Sebastian Lady Stags. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netSan Sebastian continued its rampage, posting its fourth straight win with a 25-23, 25-6, 25-14 victory over Lyceum in the NCAA Season 93 women’s volleyball tournament Sunday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.Nikka Marielle Dalisay carried the load for the Lady Stags with 16 points, 12 coming off kills and four off service aces.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Joyce Sta. Rita and Dangie Encarnacion also poured in 10 hits apiece.The Lady Stags rose to 5-2 as the undermanned squad now sits at third place, behind unbeaten Arellano and San Beda.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBien Elaine Juanillo led the fight for the Lady Pirates with eight points.In the second match, Jose Rizal University shook off a late fightback by Mapua to win in four sets, 25-23, 25-18, 20-25, 25-22. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View comments Dolly Grace Verzosa unleashed 21 points, 19 coming off spikes, to go with two aces while Shola Alvarez scored 13 of her 15 points off hits.Karen Cay Montojo added 12 as JRU climbed to 4-3.The Lady Bombers were poised to win in straight sets, but the Lady Cardinals battled back to force the fourth set.Katrina Racelis paced winless Mapua (0-7) with 16 kills, while Jan Andrea Morano had 10.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Asian Games 2018: Sushil Kumar stunned in 74kg wrestling qualifier

first_imgIn a major upset, two-time Olympic medallist Sushil Kumar suffered a shocking defeat at the hands of Bahrain’s Adam Batirov in the 74kg category, as the Indian wrestling team’s campaign at the 18th Asian Games began on a sour note in Jakarta.Sushil lost his qualification round 3-5 to Batirov.Sushil led 2-1 after the first period with a take down but the Bahrini made a strong comeback to silence the Indian fans.The London Olympics silver medallist created two opportunities to score in the second period but could not convert while Batirov did not miss his chances. He led 3-2 with a take down and then pushed the Indian out for a win.Sushil was not yet out of the competition and if Batirov makes the final, the Indian will be in with a chance to win bronze through repechage.Meanwhile, Sandeep Tomar won his 1/8 round 12-8 against Turkmenistan’s Rstem Nazarov to move into the quarter-finals of the men’s 57kg freestyle event.(With PTI inputs)last_img read more

Spotted Hornelen Reaches Norway

first_imgImage Courtesy: Redwise Maritime ServicesIn today’s spotted we bring you the image of Norwegian ferry operator Fjord1’s newly built ferry Hornelen seen at the port of Florø, Norway, following her maiden voyage. Hornelen and her sister vessel Losna were ordered by Fjord1 at Ada shipyard in Turkey in January 2015. The vessels were designed by Multi maritime.Fjord1 contracted ship delivery specialist Redwise Maritime Services to deliver both vessels under own power, on their maiden voyage.The Hornelen is classed by DNV-GL and equipped with two Caterpillar C32 main engines. The 74 meter vessel can carry 199 passengers, 60 cars and 5 trucks.The ferry will enter service on Måløy-Oldeide in Western Norway.Apart from the crew, including Fjord1 representatives, Redwise provided for the fuel, lubricants and filters for the voyage, together with the usual sets of updated charts, Nautical Publications etc.In addition Redwise added their satellite communication equipment sets and medical chest, handled ports clearances and the entire vessel management.last_img read more

California seeks to bring hightech to state government

first_img SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom is looking for a leader interested in “breaking things, and making them better,” who prioritizes “openness” and “simplicity” and can “feed and sustain team energy and enthusiasm.”“While you think long-term, your bias for action ensures you gain traction quickly,” reads the job description for the head of California’s new Office of Digital Innovation.It sounds more like a job advertisement for a Silicon Valley startup than state government — and that’s the point. Newsom wants the $26 million, 50-person office to throw away the old playbook and find ways to be more user-friendly for the state’s 40 million residents when they do such things as seek benefits, start a business or renew a driver’s license.California government has tried to infuse innovation before.The state’s technology department runs a digital innovation academy and an innovation lab, and it issued guidelines to make state websites more usable last year. The Government Operations Agency, which will oversee the new office, already has a director of innovation and accountability. The health and human services agency has its own innovation office.“Only Sacramento can take innovation and make it more bureaucratic,” said Assemblyman Vince Fong, R-Bakersfield, who noted problems persist with the state’s technology, from the Department of Motor Vehicles to a new state accounting system.Even the DMV, which has been plagued by hours-long lines and other hang ups, already has a Newsom-appointed “strike team” focused on improving its operations. The agency is closing its offices statewide for a half-day in July for employee training.Members of the Newsom administration said the new office can bring a fresh perspective to state operations, ideally helping the state run more like a business. They want people to access state services with the ease of ordering a ride, a meal or nearly anything else with the tap of a smartphone.“In your everyday life you have these great interactions with business,” said Mike Wilkening, the governor’s special adviser on innovation and digital services. “They make it as seamless as possible for you to conduct business with them — and the state does not.”While there’s broad agreement that improvement is needed, some critics and supporters alike see potential for the new office to become just another layer of bureaucracy.“It’s going to be interesting to see how they organize those 50 people, how they ensure that they are not being redundant with what the other organizations are doing and how they integrate,” said Teri Takai, a former chief information officer for California who now runs the Center for Digital Government, a 20-year-old national research and advisory organization for best practices in state and local government. She was an adviser to Newsom’s transition team and advocated for the creation of the office.She said other states are initiating similar efforts, though not all with a full department like California is doing. Alaska and New Jersey, for example, recently hired chief innovation officers.Administration officials say the office would complement, not duplicate, existing state programs. An agency could, for example, bring a problem for the office to tackle, or the Newsom administration could request the office look into something specific.“The governor would have no lack of ideas on ways we can improve services to Californians,” said Brian Ferguson, a Newsom spokesman.Once it comes up with an idea, the office would kick back some of the work of making it happen to the state agency that brought the problem or to the California Department of Technology if the solution is one that could improve service statewide, said Amy Tong, the state’s chief information officer.“It’s complementary in the sense that the Department of Technology is still going to be very much focusing on statewide technology initiatives,” Tong said. “Digital innovation would focus more on the front-end planning and discovery work.”Brian Metzker studied the proposal for the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst’s Office and said the work the new office will do appears different from other state programs. But he noted its duties will evolve once a director is hired and the office gets up and running.“It will be important for lawmakers to keep an eye on the office to make sure it’s not offering competing or duplicative services as it gets to work,” he said.Fong, the Republican lawmaker, agreed government needs an overhaul, even as he questioned Newsom’s approach.“Tech has changed for the better everything in our daily lives, whether it’s from travel, from booking services that we use in our daily lives or buying groceries,” he said. But, “state government has lagged behind because all they do is create more red tape and bureaucracy.”Beyond the director, Newsom will appoint 19 other employees who will be exempt from civil service. Thirty others will be hired through the normal government process.Of the new office’s $26 million budget, $10 million would go into a fund it could tap to complete its work. The budget in following years would be $14 million. June 26, 2019 AP AP, Posted: June 26, 2019 California seeks to bring high-tech to state government Categories: California News, Local San Diego News, Politics FacebookTwitterlast_img read more