My Child Is Delivering Food With Their Car Do I Need to

first_imgMy Child Is Delivering Food With Their Car. Do I Need to Share This With My Insurance Agent?January 25, 2019 By Administrator It is great that your child has a job and is earning their own money. The modern world of convenience is offering us many new ways to get food and almost instant retail deliveries, but what you should know is that your standard auto insurance policy likely does not cover you for delivery type services.Regardless of what you deliver, a personal auto insurance policy doesn’t provide coverage for paid delivery drivers. For this, you need a commercial auto policy.A commercial auto insurance policy is needed for:Freight deliveryFood delivery servicesCourier delivery services& many more!Some people think that simply not telling their insurance company means they won’t be able to charge them the extra premium and that they will pay the loss. Don’t kid yourself. Simply not telling your insurance company that you or your child is using their vehicle for delivery does not mean they will cover you when a loss occurs using the vehicle. In fact, when it comes to insurance, it is a black and white coverage decision. Either there is coverage or there isn’t.When deciding what coverage you need, ask yourself these questions:Who owns the vehicle you’re using for delivery? If it is owned by the company, they probably have a commercial policy. If you own it, you need to carry the right insurance.How are you using this vehicle? Delivery drivers need a commercial insurance policy.Your best bet is to talk to a licensed agents in our office to discuss your insurance needs. Remember, simply not telling your agent or your company that you or your child is using the vehicle for delivery doesn’t mean you’ll be provided coverage regardless of any auto insurance claim you have to deal with. Contact us if you have questions or need an insurance review.Filed Under: Bloglast_img read more

Study Coarse particulate matter in air triggers inflammation and cancer biomarkers in

first_imgMay 8 2018Prolonged exposure to particulate matter in air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin triggered inflammation and the appearance of cancer-related genes in the brains of rats, a Cedars-Sinai study has found.While previous research has documented the association between air pollution and a variety of diseases, including cancer, the study found markers indicating certain materials in coarse air pollution-;nickel, in particular-;may play a role in genetic changes related to disease development, said Julia Ljubimova, MD, PhD.Ljubimova, director of the Nanomedicine Research Center at Cedars-Sinai, is the lead author of the paper, published April 9 in Scientific Reports.”This study, which looked at novel data gathered in the Los Angeles area, has significant implications for the assessment of air quality in the region, particularly as people are exposed to air pollution here for decades,” Ljubimova said.Related StoriesStudy: Causes of anorexia are likely metabolic and psychologicalResearch finds link between air pollution and coronary heart disease in ChinaGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”The study found that coarse particulate matter in the region’s air pollution found its way into bodily systems in two ways: inhaled through the lungs, where trace metals and other materials enter the bloodstream and then the brain; and through the nose, where the materials are absorbed more directly into the brain.”Cleaning the air in the Los Angeles Basin has been a long and arduous task, and we are happy to support the research that produced such a groundbreaking paper,” said William A. Burke, EdD, chairman of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. “We must continue to shed light on how air pollution negatively affects our health.”Ljubimova noted that while the study’s findings may be unique to the composition of air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin, “There are many examples of potentially damaging effects of air pollution exposures in major cities. Our modern society is becoming increasingly urbanized and exposed to air pollution. This trend underscores the need for additional research on the biology of air-pollution-induced organ damage, along with a concerted effort aimed at reducing ambient air pollution levels.”Eggehard Holler, PhD, professor of Neurosurgery, was senior author of the study “Coarse Particulate Matter in Los Angeles Basin Air Induces Expression of Inflammation and Cancer Biomarkers in Rat Brains.”Source: https://www.cedars-sinai.org/last_img read more

Delivery of thrombolytic treatment for stroke in Helsinki beats expectations

first_imgJul 13 2018Neurologists around the world are aware that the delivery of thrombolytic treatment for stroke in Helsinki University Hospital, Finland, is freaking fast – but is it too fast? A new study published on July 11th in the journal Neurology clarified whether the team of neurologists in Helsinki actually have enough time to diagnose stroke correctly before it is treated. Every day roughly three new stroke suspects are rushed by ambulance to Helsinki University Hospital Emergency Department to be considered for urgent clot-busting thrombolytic therapy or thrombectomy to prevent permanent stroke caused by acute cerebral ischemia. But perilously, out of one hundred such ‘thrombolysis candidates’ only half is actually caused by this condition and the rest have other kinds of diagnoses. Despite the tremendous time-pressure, the rapid diagnoses need to be accurate. For almost two decades the neurologists and emergency physicians in Helsinki have endeavoured to build the most efficient acute stroke chain of recovery in the world.”Already since 2011 we have managed to examine the admitted stroke suspect patient, perform the necessary brain imaging and complete the decision regarding thrombolysis in less than average 20 minutes’ ‘door-to-needle time'”, says Professor of Neurology, Chief Physician Perttu Lindsberg, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital. He continues:”But we wondered whether this narrow time frame could in fact backfire and lead to underperformance in the diagnostic accuracy.”To clarify this, Lindsberg and colleagues initiated a study, which was published on July 11th in the journal Neurology. The prospective study cohort consisted of 1 015 patients, which had been transported to Helsinki University Hospital Emergency Department as emergency stroke code patients during 2013 to 2015.”The results proved that for every hundred stroke code patients, only two received unnecessary thrombolysis or missed it because of inaccurate initial admission diagnosis”, tells Lindsberg.Related StoriesPeople who worked long hours have higher risk of stroke, shows studyNew discovery may explain some forms of strokeNew method improves detection of atrial fibrillation in stroke survivorsAchieving the accurate diagnosis was most challenging in the so-called stroke mimic conditions, which represent various conditions related e.g. to epileptic seizures, migraine, psychogenic disturbances or just nonspecific headache or numbness.Diagnostic inaccuracy was deemed to have influenced patient management in 6.9 percent of the stroke code patients. For example, it could have delayed the initiation of standard treatment for the underlying condition. In detailed scrutiny, however, it was established that inaccurate admission diagnosis had potentially worsened the outcome in only eight (0.8%) patients and no patient died for this.The Finnish investigation was commented in Neurology in an accompanying Editorial article, where the results were considered convincing.”The results showed that the stroke chain of recovery, which we have been gradually optimizing for years, is both safe and expeditious, and that the speed has not been achieved at the expense of diagnostic inaccuracy”, corroborates Perttu Lindsberg.”This study has provided us also with useful comparator values, which allow us to monitor our performance in the face of potential organizational renovations, and perhaps other hospitals can also use them for benchmarking. In common, debilitating diseases such as stroke we cannot accept the slightest decline of the delivery of effective treatments, neither in the diagnostic performance nor in the efficiency of management. Operation can always be optimized, but only on top of existing expertise.”Lindsberg considers that one area of future development in ED stroke evaluation is the more active utilization of rapid magnetic resonance imaging, especially in patients with challenging or unusual clinical syndromes as well as in those stroke thrombolysis candidates with unknown symptom onset time. Source:https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/health/how-fast-can-acute-stroke-treatment-become-to-still-be-reliable-stroke-thrombolysis-treatment-in-helsinki-beats-expectationslast_img read more

Rush University Medical Center opens Angelman Syndrome Clinic

first_imgAug 23 2018Rush University Medical Center and the Angelman Syndrome Foundation (ASF), a national nonprofit organization headquartered in Aurora, Ill., announced the official opening of the Angelman Syndrome Clinic at Rush Children’s Hospital. The Angelman Syndrome Clinic at Rush is the first and only in Illinois and one of only eight in the U.S.”Rush is focused on serving the comprehensive medical needs of individuals with Angelman syndrome,” said Dr. Cesar Ochoa-Lubinoff, co-director of the Angelman Clinic at Rush. “With the creation of the clinic, individuals with Angelman syndrome and their families can access multiple subspecialists and a variety of medical resources in one setting, as opposed to visiting multiple locations across the nation.””Individuals with Angelman syndrome have extreme challenges obtaining the care they need as they grow into adults,” said Dr. Elizabeth Berry-Kravis, co-director of the Angelman Clinic at Rush. “Our hospital is uniquely positioned to provide services to this portion of the population and their families.””Our partnership with the ASF has allowed us to further meet these needs and provide the comprehensive medical services that improve patient and families’ quality of life,” said Ochoa-Lubinoff.Clinic aims to reduce severity of symptoms that interfere with functionsOccurring in one in 15,000 live births, Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder often misdiagnosed as autism or cerebral palsy – that causes severe neurological impairment, appears in newborns and lasts for a lifetime. During fetal development, the loss of function of a particular gene in the brain occurs, resulting in neurons functioning improperly and causing deficits in development.Individuals with Angelman syndrome experience developmental delay, lack of speech, seizures, walking and balance disorders, and typically exhibit a happy demeanor characterized by frequent smiling, laughter and excitability. Caregivers need to provide constant supervision and often experience pain, stress, anxiety and exhaustion.The Angelman Syndrome Clinic at Rush is unique as it can leverage the variety of expertise and specialized care available at Rush to help individuals with Angelman syndrome from infancy through adulthood.Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaThe purpose of the clinic is to reduce the frequency and severity of Angelman syndrome symptoms that interfere with function, such as seizures, behavior and sleep problems. In addition, the clinic will work with families to develop educational recommendations to optimize educational programming for individuals with Angelman syndrome, thus helping these individuals achieve their full developmental potential.Clinic provides comprehensive care from multiple specialists in a single locationWith the ultimate goal of improving quality of life for individuals with Angelman syndrome, the clinic provides comprehensive access to neurologists, epileptologists, developmental-behavioral pediatricians, psychologists, and a sleep medicine physician, rehabilitation medicine specialist, gastroenterologist, pulmonologist, speech language pathologist, physical/occupational therapist, genetic counselor, social worker and nutritionist all specializing in Angelman syndrome.As part of the commitment to improving the lives of patients and families living with Angelman syndrome, the medical team participates in the latest clinical research protocols and trials.”Opening this clinic at Rush University Medical Center – in our own headquarter’s backyard – is an exciting milestone for ASF. Our mission is to provide help and support to individuals with Angelman syndrome and their families across the country, and this new clinic will bring the best, comprehensive medical care to so many in need,” said Eileen Braun, executive director of the Angelman Syndrome Foundation and mother to a young woman with Angelman syndrome. “We are thrilled to help bring this significant resource to the greater Chicago area, and we could not be more proud to partner with Rush University Medical Center and their remarkable team of professionals to bring this clinic to life.”The Angelman Syndrome Clinic at Rush University Medical Center is located at 1725 W. Harrison St., Suite 710. Chicago. Appointments can be made by calling (312) 942-9645. Source:https://www.rush.edu/last_img read more

Eagles collapse wings to deal with turbulence

first_imgScientists have questioned how birds manage to fly in turbulent and windy skies that keep our airplanes grounded for some time, and now, thanks to a 75-gram flight recorder and an eagle named Cossack (pictured), they may have their answer. GPS data combined with analysis of acceleration, rotation rate, and airspeed revealed that the secret to the birds’ success may be their collapsible wings. The results, published online today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, show that in times of turbulence, the birds tuck their wings beneath their bodies for a fraction of a second to avoid being blown off course—a technique that our fixed-wing aircraft will unfortunately not be emulating any time soon. The “wing tuck” technique is typically employed as the birds cross over rising patches of warm air, which any good glider pilot knows are usually the most turbulent. Tucking dulls the jolting and is thought to reduce strain on the birds’ muscles, allowing them to soar longer before fatiguing.last_img read more

Smart plants could soon detect deadly radon and mold in your home

first_img Email But before they can do that, scientists will need to analyze the DNA of several houseplant species to figure out what kinds of reactions can be manipulated—and what kinds of signals can be made. That’s because, unlike crops and many popular flowering plants, little is known about the genes of houseplants. Once researchers zero in on the genes they can manipulate, though, be on the lookout for your new, whole-house “check engine” light.*Correction, 20 July, 9:55 a.m.: An earlier version of this story misstated the Latin name for the tobacco plant. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Frankie SchembriJul. 19, 2018 , 2:00 PMcenter_img Your favorite succulent just got a little more succulent. Inspired by smoke detectors and smart home monitors, scientists are genetically engineering houseplants to sense harmful chemicals from mold and other kinds of fungi—and alert homeowners to their presence. If they can figure out how houseplants respond to other threats, such as radon and airborne pathogens, researchers could one day engineer “smart plants” to tackle a whole host of problems.The idea has already been tested on the farm, researchers write in a review published today in Science. From 2012 to 2013, plant scientists modified tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum) to produce excessive amounts of orange fluorescent protein when they encountered disease-causing bacteria. To do so, researchers first identified the genes in the tobacco plant genome that were likely to react to harmful airborne chemicals known as volatile organic compounds. Then, they inserted synthetic “promoters” into the plants’ DNA to crank those reactions up to 10. When the engineered plants sensed the bacteria, their cells reacted by pumping out the orange fluorescent protein. To detect the signal, farmers simply had to put on light-filtering goggles and see whether the plants glowed orange under a green light, the researchers reported previously in Plant Biotechnology Journal.That technology could soon move inside the home, say reviewers, where “living walls” of genetically modified plants could be installed near air vents, where they might one day be able to sense toxic mold growth and airborne viruses, like the flu. Right now, just like the tobacco plant, they would have to be illuminated to see the signal, in this case with ultraviolet light. Scientists hope to soon discover proteins in houseplants that could produce a signal visible to the naked human eye. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country ‘Smart plants’ could soon detect deadly radon and mold in your homelast_img read more

European physicists unveil plans for a particle collider that would be longer

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) CERN has succeeded with such tunnel visions before. It built the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider, which operated from 1989 to 2001 and studied in detail previously discovered standard model particles called the W and Z bosons. CERN then ripped out the LEP and built the LHC in same tunnel.European physicists have competition, however. Physicists in China have their own plans to build a 100-kilometer-long electron-positron ring, perhaps by 2030, and to follow it with a proton collider. Meanwhile, physicists in Japan hope to build a 20-kilometer-long straight-shot linear collider. It, too, would collide electrons and positrons to generate Higgs bosons. Researchers at CERN also have plans for a linear collider that works on a more novel acceleration technique.The case for building any new collider is weaker than particle physicists had hoped it would be when the LHC started to take data in 2010. They had hoped that in addition to—or perhaps instead of—the Higgs, the LHC would blast out other new particles and break their decadeslong stalemate with the standard model. The LHC has yet to produce any such particles—although CERN researchers plan to collect more than 10 times the data that they have now. Without some additional discovery, however, physicists may face a tough sell in convincing governments to spend billions of dollars to study the Higgs alone. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email CERN European physicists unveil plans for a particle collider that would be longer than the Panama Canalcenter_img By Adrian ChoJan. 15, 2019 , 4:55 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe An artist’s impression of a particle collision in CERN’s future collider European particle physicists today released a conceptual design for a successor to the world’s biggest atom smasher, the 27-kilometer-long Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which straddles the border between Switzerland and France. The report calls for an even bigger accelerator, that would be 100 kilometers in circumference, to study in detail the Higgs boson, the weird new particle that the LHC discovered to great fanfare in 2012. The new machine, known for the moment as the Future Circular Collider (FCC), would cost €9 billion. It would begin operations around 2040, after the LHC is scheduled to shut down, according to a statement issued by CERN, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland.The LHC smashes protons into protons to generate the most energetic collisions currently possible. In contrast, the proposed FCC would smash electrons into their antimatter counterparts, positrons at energies 35 times lower than the LHC (but higher than any previous electron-positron collider). The electron-positron collisions would still be energetic enough to create Higgs bosons, but they would also be far cleaner and easier to analyze than the LHC’s collisions. That’s because protons are messy objects made of other particles called quarks and gluons. In contrast, electrons and positrons are, as far as physicists know, indivisible fundamental particles.The electron-positron collider would look for hints of physics beyond scientists’ prevailing standard model by searching for discrepancies between how the Higgs decays and standard model predictions. The FCC would also serve as a stepping stone to another future proton collider that could reach an energy seven times higher than the LHC, which might blast into existence new particles whose existence the electron-positron could only infer. The machine would cost an additional €15 billion and would fit into the FCC’s tunnel in the mid-2050s or later. The FCC would help make that ultimate machine more affordable by covering the €5 billion cost of the tunnel.last_img read more

Power from peat—more polluting than coal—is on its way out in Ireland

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) KLAUS-WERNER FRIEDRICH/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email On a cold, gray morning in November, the Corneveagh Bog in central Ireland is a scene of industrial harvest. Like other Irish bogs, it has been drained and stripped of its moss and heather to reveal the rich, black soil beneath: peat. The peat is scored with tread marks left by the machines that shaved off a crumbly layer and turned it over to dry. A long mound of peat, stripped and dried earlier in the season, is covered in plastic, waiting to be piled into rail cars and taken to a nearby power plant. There, the carbon-rich soil will be burned to generate electricity.But not for much longer, says Barry O’Loughlin, an ecologist employed by Bord na Móna, a state-owned peat harvesting and energy company based in Newbridge that owns Corneveagh Bog. Bord na Móna, which means “Peat Board,” will soon retire dozens of bogs like Corneveagh from energy production. Its team of four ecologists will rehabilitate many of them by blocking drains, soaking the ground, and reestablishing plant life, O’Loughlin says as his boots crunch through the frosty soil. “We bring life back into the bog again.”In Ireland, peat has been used for centuries to warm homes and fire whiskey distilleries. For a country with little coal, oil, and gas, peat—deep layers of partially decayed moss and other plant matter—is also a ready fuel for power plants. Peat power peaked in the 1960s, providing 40% of Ireland’s electricity. But peat is particularly polluting. Burning it for electricity emits more carbon dioxide than coal, and nearly twice as much as natural gas. In 2016, peat generated nearly 8% of Ireland’s electricity, but was responsible for 20% of that sector’s carbon emissions. “The ceasing of burning peat is a no-brainer,” says Tony Lowes, a founder of Friends of the Irish Environment in Eyeries. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Power from peat—more polluting than coal—is on its way out in Ireland That is now beginning to happen. By the end of 2019, the Irish government will eliminate all of the roughly €100 million in annual industry subsidies it now pays for peat-generated electricity. Bord na Móna, which supplies peat to the three remaining power stations burning it for electricity, announced in October that it would cut its peat supply for electricity by a third by 2020 and end it completely by 2027. Ireland will need to find alternative, lower carbon sources of electricity. And approximately 60 bogs no longer needed for fuel will be converted back to wetlands or put to commercial uses such as land for wind farms.Behind the phaseout is Ireland’s promise to the European Union to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% in 2020, compared with 2005 levels. “The country’s decarbonization agenda is driving Bord na Móna’s step down from peat,” says Joe Lane, the company’s chief operating officer. Even so, Ireland will miss its goal. Despite rapid growth in wind power and increasingly energy efficient homes and vehicles, it will struggle to reduce emissions by even 1%, says Phillip O’Brien, scientific officer for the Irish Environmental Protection Agency in Dublin.Like any energy transition, this one comes with a human cost. Up to 430 jobs will be lost, Lane says. “Most of the people who will lose their jobs are people who have worked for Bord na Móna for a long time—people whose fathers, grandfathers, and villages are all tied to the company.”And replacing peat with biomass, as the power companies plan to do, is not a panacea. A decade ago, Bord na Móna began to cofuel a peat-burning station with mixtures of biomass including a grass called miscanthus, olive pits, almond shells, palm kernel shells, and beet pulp, much of it imported from all over the world. Because biomass takes up carbon from the atmosphere as it grows, the European Union counts it as a carbon-neutral, renewable resource—even though transportation, processing, and land-use costs make it less so. “The unregulated or unfettered use of biomass would lead to serious problems,” says Robert Matthews, a scientist at Forest Research in Surrey, U.K. In 2021, European legislation will tighten biomass standards, reducing the advantages of burning it from a carbon accounting standpoint.Rehabilitating the harvested peatlands, however, is a clear plus for climate. When bogs are drained to harvest peat, or for any other use, such as agriculture, grazing, or forestry, exposure to oxygen jump-starts the decomposition of the stored organic matter, releasing carbon into the atmosphere. A 2013 study of Irish peatland carbon emissions, published in Irish Geography, found that each hectare of industrially drained and stripped peatland emits 2.1 tons of carbon per year—the equivalent of driving a car 30,000 kilometers. And that’s before the harvested peat is burned.Those emissions cease as soon as drains are blocked and the water table rises to resaturate the peat, cutting off oxygen. As a result, ecologists say, conserving peatlands has a triple benefit: reducing emissions from both power plants and exposed fields and, with restored plant life, sequestering more carbon in future peat deposits. “Peatlands are our rainforest, our carbon sink,” Lowes says.Moreover, healthy peatlands improve water quality and provide needed habitat for threatened species such as curlews and marsh fritillary butterflies. “Our goal is to make things as wet as we can, where we can,” says Catherine Farrell, an ecologist at Bord na Móna. She says that of the 80,000 hectares of peatland under company management, 18,000 hectares have been rehabilitated.But in a country where peat smoke rises from chimneys every day, that’s just a start. People cut peat to burn in their houses from another 600,000 hectares of peatlands, and there are few plans for rehabilitating these degraded bogs. Catherine O’Connell, director of the Irish Peatland Conservation Council in Lullymore, would like to see more action to heal the bogs. “There’s a lot of bare peat around,” she says. “There’s a lot of hemorrhaging carbon.”*Correction, 13 December, 10 a.m.: The spelling of Corneveagh Bog has been corrected throughout this article. Industrial peat extraction has stripped dozens of Irish bogs of their heather and moss. By Emily TonerDec. 12, 2018 , 2:25 PMlast_img read more

Unique species of crabs went extinct due to a militarysponsored dike

first_imgIn 1964, a curious scientific paper was published by one Gordon C. Creel, featuring a description of an extinct species of crab, discovered in a salt water spring east of Estelline, Texas. Although it’s primary habitat should have been something more along the coastline of the Pacific, Hemigrapsus estellinensis found life in the Estelline hypersaline springs, some 500 miles (800 km) from the nearest ocean, where it thrived for tens of thousands of years.It was concluded that this crab was endemic to the Texas Panhandle, but by the time the paper was published, it had already gone extinct.Comparison of the extinct varunid crab, Hemigrapsus estellinensis, and a Red River pupfish, Cyprinodon rubrofluviatilis, from the Estelline Salt Springs, Texas. Photo by Apokryltaros CC BY-SA 4.0The reason behind this was a dike built by the United States Army Corps of Engineers around the Estelline Salt Springs.The salt springs of Estelline fed into the much larger Red River, and the ring-like dike was constructed as part of a flood control effort, as well as a successful attempt to prevent the salt from the springs reaching the river.Two years prior to this intervention, Creel had collected six male and ten female specimens from the springs and used one of them as a holotype, i.e. a single physical example used for the description of all others. While all 16 specimens were primarily kept in the National Museum of Natural History, several of them were transported to Wayland College for further examination.H. estellinensis lived in Estelline Salt Springs east of the town of Estelline. Photo by Owenmoney CC BY-SA 4.0However, the crabs died from unknown reasons some 17 hours upon their arrival. In the meantime, two female specimens managed to lay 3,000 and 8,000 eggs, respectively, just before their death.Unaware of the importance of the discovery made by Gordon C. Creel in 1962, the U.S. Army followed through with their plans in January 1964, just before Creel could publish his research. This act led to a disturbance in the level of salt in the water, affecting the entire ecosystem of the Estelline springs.With the rise in salinity, the Red River pupfish, as well as a number of algae and cyanobacteria were also jeopardized, leaving the once-vibrant and closed community of life forms exposed to such a rapid change of environment that there are almost no living creatures in Estelline spings nowadays.Nevertheless, the discovery of this crab species was considered in scientific circles as a “Pleistocene relic”, marking it as a phenomenon in which a creature from the Ice Age managed to survive due to specific natural conditions of its surroundings.Described as having a rectangular carapace with almost parallel sides, it was concluded that male specimens have a carapace length of up to 18.5 millimeters (0.73 in) and width of up to 22 mm (0.87 in). The females, on the other hand, have a slightly smaller carapace of up to 17 mm (0.67 in) long and 22 mm (0.87 in) wide.The front corners of H. estellinensis’ carapace form into three strong teeth on each side.Hemigrapsus is a genus of varunid crabs comprising thirteen species found almost exclusively in the Pacific Ocean. Photo by Walter Siegmund CC BY-SA 3.0The closest relative of the Estelline crab is the Hemigrapsus oregonensis or the Oregon shore crab, from which it physically differed by several traits –the most notable of them being rust-red spots sprinkled over its back. These species exist today and inhabit San Francisco Bay, and coastal areas of Oregon and Washington states.Apart from H. estellinensis, whose discovery sparked great interest, although violently interrupted, the research which took place in Estelline also lead to the discovery of a unique species of barnacle, which died out before it could be thoroughly described.Hemigrapsus oregonensis, the closest relative of H. estellinensis, on Orcas Island, Washington. Photo by Ciar -CC BY-SA 3.0While the flood lands around Red River were contained for the benefit of the local population and the nearby military facilities, the case of H. estellinensis was handled with no care whatsoever by the authorities.Read another story from us: The Giant Coconut Crab and Amelia Earhart’s Final MomentsTherefore the situation, unfortunately, caused the extinction of one the oldest living species in the world ― one that, if preserved, might have provided answers to many of our questions, and perhaps even contributed to the advancement of mankind.last_img read more

Nostalgia for a Bygone Era Brings Guys and Dolls Back to the

first_imgSome movies are timeless, others stuck in time. That’s not always a bad thing, though. Guys and Dolls is a picturesque reminder of decades gone by. Adapted from short stories by Damon Runyon written in the 1920 and ‘30s, the now-musical was turned into a visual spectacle through the compositions of Frank Loesser (“Baby, It’s Cold Outside”) alongside a script by Jo Swerling (The Pride of the Yankees, It’s a Wonderful Life) and Abe Burrows (stage adaptation of How to Succeed In Business Without Really Trying).Guys and Dolls, Libretto and Vocal book, printed by Music Theatre International, 1978. This book was rented out to actors and actresses in the play. Photo by Goldenrowley CC BY-SA 3.0As a play, Guys and Dolls hit Broadway in 1950 and was immortalized on the silver screen in 1955, when some of Hollywood’s most celebrated actors painted an iconic picture of the age.A high school production of Guys and Dolls.Catchy hits like “Luck Be a Lady” and “Sit Down, You’re Rocking the Boat” — never mind the eponymous “Guys and Dolls” — will forever get theater lovers and classic film buffs alike ready to dive back into the Twenties and Thirties. Check out some the most common slang from the era here:Guys and Doll’s nostalgia is transparent. The Eastmancolor visuals make the picture undeniably Old Hollywood, and Jean Simmons and Vivian Blaine’s snarky accents bring viewers back to the post-war years, if not earlier.Vivian Blaine in ‘Something for the Boys’ trailer (cropped screenshot)Even though the film is set during the Depression, the men look striking in handsome pinstripe suits and the women, dolled up (if you’ll forgive the pun), command each scene with vintage fashions. Though Marlon Brando and Frank Sinatra, playing opposite Simmons and Blaine, melt hearts with their sultry tones (okay, maybe Sinatra more than Brando) and equally sultry looks to this day, a remake is officially in the works.The performance of Marlon Brando (shown here much earlier in his career) as Colonel Walter E. Kurtz was critically acclaimedTriStar has successfully obtained the rights to the original Runyon short stories, Loesser’s musical score, and the Samuel Goldwyn Company’s go-ahead for the modern remake. With the full trifecta of power behind them, we can only hope that one of the film industry’s biggest picture houses will do the beloved classic some justice.According to the Hollywood Reporter, it will be produced by John Goldwyn (Dexter, I’m Not There) and Marc Toberoff (I Spy), with Meyer Gottlieb (The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World) as executive producer.Their work will be cut out for them. Musical fans, sometimes dedicated at cult-like levels, are already hard to please. The next few years will be even more challenging for purists as several other musicals await a modern reenactment. Cats comes out Christmas 2019 with an impressively extensive all-star cast, Steven Spielberg’s take on West Side Story is awaits a release date, and Wicked is slated for 2021.Lizbeth Webb as Sarah Brown in the original London production of ‘Guys And Dolls’ at The Coliseum Theatre, 1953It’s unsure when the Guys and Dolls remake will be released, but it’s more than likely that it will be a contender for that year’s Oscars. The original musical won five Tony Awards upon its premiere in 1950 and another four after its revival in 1992. The 1955 film was nominated for four Oscars and won two Golden Globe Awards.Read another story from us: Lethal Weapon 5 May Be Moving ForwardOklahoma! beat out Guys and Dolls in the 28th Academy Awards for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture, so superstitious fans will have to keep their fingers crossed that its remake isn’t in the works in the next couple years.last_img read more

Watch Author Amish Tripathi at Express Adda

first_img Advertising Author Amish Tripathi is guest at Express Adda today Related News Extreme left, right have captured public debate: Author Amish Tripathi By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Published: July 8, 2019 7:35:21 pm Amish had worked for over a decade in the financial services industry before he decided to drop his surname and set out to make a name as a writer.After the thumping success of the first book, he brought out the next two instalments of The Shiva Trilogy in quick succession — The Secret of the Nagas (2011), and The Oath of the Vayuputras (2013) — making it, arguably, the fastest-selling book series in the history of publishing in India.The Express Adda is a series of informal interactions organised by The Indian Express Group and features those at the centre of change. Famous writer, and now director of the Nehru Centre in London, Amish Tripathi is at the Indian Express Adda. 1 Comment(s) ‘That this election is so unpredictable tells us how robust our democratic process is’: Ruchir Sharma last_img read more

Brazils Bolsonaro offers his son the post of ambassador in Washington

first_img Advertising Best Of Express Advertising Related News jair bolsonaro, brazil president, brazilian president jair bolsonaro, brazil president jair bolsonaro, eduardo bolsonaro, world news, Indian Express Bolsonaro’s eldest son, Flavio, is advancing his conservative social agenda as a senator. (File)Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro said on Thursday he had invited his son Eduardo to become ambassador to the United States, underscoring his family’s influential role in the country’s diplomacy and domestic politics. Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Cocaine found on Brazil President Bolsonaro’s security plane bound for G-20 summit Eduardo Bolsonaro, currently a federal congressman, told reporters separately he would accept the role if nominated. His father said earlier that the appointment would hinge on his son’s acceptance.“If it is a mission given by the president, I would accept,” Eduardo Bolsonaro told reporters, adding he was prepared to resign from Congress if the president appoints him.He added the ultimate nomination still depended on conversations with his father and Foreign Minister Ernesto Araujo. Brazil struggles through President Jair Bolsonaro’s first six months center_img The appointment would need to be approved by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee before passing to the full upper house for confirmation.Brazil’s previous ambassador to Washington retired in April.The far-right Brazilian president, who said his campaign last year was inspired by U.S. President Donald Trump, has made friendly overtures to the American leader and made similar use of family members as official advisers.Bolsonaro’s eldest son, Flavio, is advancing his conservative social agenda as a senator.Carlos Bolsonaro, another son of the president and a Rio de Janeiro city councilman, has taken a role in his father’s social media communications and stirred controversy by attacking members of the Brazilian Cabinet. Post Comment(s) Brazilians hold general strike to protest pension overhaul Eduardo Bolsonaro, the third of the president’s four sons and a daughter from three marriages, has counseled his father on foreign affairs.After his father’s election in October, Eduardo Bolsonaro was one of his first envoys to Washington, where he met with Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, Jared Kushner, and was spotted wearing a “Trump 2020” cap.Former Trump adviser Steve Bannon named the younger Bolsonaro the Latin American leader of his right-wing nationalist organization, “The Movement.”During the Brazilian leader’s White House visit in March, Trump heaped praise on Eduardo Bolsonaro, who sat by his father during an Oval Office chat while Brazil’s foreign minister and ambassador in Washington were nowhere to be seen. By Reuters |Brasilia(brazil) | Published: July 12, 2019 8:46:20 am NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief last_img read more

Boosting genetic diversity may save vanishing animal populations But it may also

first_imgIn both streams, the populations increased 10-fold and genetic diversity doubled. Later generations were more fecund, with many of the most fit offspring being hybrids of the local and introduced fish, Reid reported at the meeting. But the findings also sounded a note of caution. In the second stream, the rapid infusion of new fish almost completely eliminated pure residents—an outcome conservationists usually hope to avoid. That result suggests “a slow trickle of immigration might be preferable,” Fitzpatrick says.Another genomic study showed some small populations experience natural genetic rescue—and benefit from it. Nancy Chen, a population geneticist at the University of Rochester in New York, and her team study the threatened Florida scrub jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), whose numbers are down to a few thousand individuals, split among a few hundred sites. For 50 years, researchers have regularly counted and assessed all the jays found at Archbold Biological Station near Lake Placid, Florida. More recently, they’ve collected blood samples from each bird, which enabled Chen and her colleagues to track genetic changes over time.The team discovered that the population naturally gets a slow infusion of new blood. Typically, birds trickle in from smaller groups a few kilometers away. The newcomers are less genetically diverse than those already there, but because they are from a different population, they help maintain the resident group’s diversity. However, with fewer birds arriving in recent years because of population declines, that diversity is declining, putting the population at risk of dying out. “Gene flow from small populations may be really important,” she concluded at the meeting.Most biologists have assumed that larger populations are better sources of new blood. But Chris Kyriazis, a graduate student at the University of California, Los Angeles, used computer models to study the impact of deleterious mutations hidden in a source population. Because such mutations tend to be harmful only when both parents pass the mutation to offspring, they are likely to be eliminated from historically small, inbred populations and to persist in larger ones. Kyriazis’s modeling suggests intermediate-size populations, not the biggest ones, could be the best source for genetic rescues, he reported at the meeting and in a preprint posted 21 June on bioRxiv.Sometimes, genomic results suggest the rescue strategy may backfire. Just 1000 island foxes (Urocyon littoralis) are left on California’s Santa Catalina Island, and 60% of them have a cancer that affects their ears. Paul Hohenlohe, an evolutionary biologist from the University of Idaho in Moscow, had identified many genes that make the foxes susceptible to the cancer and wondered whether they were a candidate for genetic rescue. But he found that the Santa Catalina foxes have a genetic advantage over neighboring populations that might be sources of new blood: They have more variation throughout their genome, including in the cancer genes, he reported at the meeting. Furthermore, the Santa Catalina foxes are better adapted to the island’s hot, arid climate than the other foxes, many of which live on wetter, cooler islands. So, he recommends letting nature take its course and monitoring whether the foxes eventually evolve resistance to the cancer.These studies are helping invigorate a strategy that many believe is sorely needed. Fitzpatrick says, “The urgency of the problem and the availability of the tools makes it a really exciting time.” Email Boosting genetic diversity may save vanishing animal populations. But it may also backfire PROVIDENCE—The expanding global human footprint is dividing the world’s flora and fauna into ever-smaller, more isolated populations that could wink out because of inbreeding, disease, or environmental change. For decades, conservationists have proposed revitalizing those holdouts by bringing in new blood from larger populations. But they’ve wondered whether it really works—and how to do it without swamping the genetic identity and unique adaptations of the group at risk. Last month at Evolution 2019 here, researchers described how genomic tools are refining what is known as genetic rescue.Although zoos have worked to maintain genetic diversity in endangered species by carefully matching individual animals for breeding, the strategy has rarely been tried in nature. Genetic rescue “should be attempted more frequently,” Andrew Whiteley, a conservation genomicist at the University of Montana in Missoula, and his colleagues wrote last week in Trends in Ecology and Evolution. But showing that it works requires tracking multiple generations for years, something few studies have attempted. And researchers have only recently been able to detect what happens on a molecular level. Now, says Sarah Fitzpatrick, an evolutionary biologist at Michigan State University’s (MSU’s) W. K. Kellogg Biological Station in Hickory Corners, “We have genomic tools to study these populations … in ways we never could before.”Adding new blood to small populations really does help, a long-term experimental evolution study of wild guppies in Trinidad has demonstrated, says Brendan Reid, an MSU conservation biologist who works with Fitzpatrick. Decades ago, researchers seeded the headwaters of two streams in the mountainous country with guppies taken from a distant habitat. In one stream, the displaced fish had to travel a long way and only slowly made their way downstream to a small, isolated population. In the other stream, the fish more quickly joined another isolated group. Every month for 2.5 years, Fitzpatrick and her colleagues caught, marked, and studied all the fish they could find at the isolated groups’ territories before returning the fish to the streams. They tracked the growth, survival, and genetic diversity of the fish over about seven generations. 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Countrycenter_img Tim Zurowski/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Elizabeth PennisiJul. 16, 2019 , 5:55 PM A Florida scrub jay population relies on birds from other groups to sustain its genetic diversity.last_img read more

Assam floods Death toll rises to 11

first_img Assam floods: Centre releases Rs 250 crore aid as death toll touches 17 “As per the Met department forecast, there will be more rainfall across Assam and the water level in the Brahmaputra is likely to rise,” Kumar Sanjay Krishna, additional chief secretary (revenue and disaster management), said at a press conference on Sunday. “Dhubri and other lower Assam districts will probably see more severe flood in coming days.”Krishna said the state government was fully capable of handling the situation. “Last year, we had received Rs 590 crore from the Centre. We have sufficient funds in our hands and already released Rs 55.85 crore to the districts,” he said.Meanwhile, the NDRF and SDRF have rescued 7,833 people in the past 24 hours across the state. As many as 10,840 litres of mustard oil, 7,922 quintals of rice, tarpaulin sheets, water pouches, biscuits, milk powder, dal, salt and other essential items have been distributed among the flood-affected people.About 70 per cent of the Kaziranga National Park, the habitat of the Great Indian Rhino and a world heritage site, has been affected too, the official said. “Many animals have moved to highlands. We have a sufficient stock of fodder and forest officials are on alert.” Related News Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Best Of Express NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Advertising An Assam State Disaster Management Authority (ASDMA) report said four fresh deaths were reported from Jorhat, Barpeta and Dhubri districts.Of the 28 affected districts, Barpeta is the worst hit with 7.35 lakh people affected, followed by Morigaon where 3.50 lakh people are hit. They are followed by Dhubri where the number of affected is 3.38 lakh, the ASDMA said.Till Saturday, around 14.06 lakh people were affected in 25 districts out of the total 33 districts. In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief By PTI |Guwahati | Updated: July 14, 2019 8:38:19 pm More Explained Hima Das donates half of salary for Assam flood relief, appeals for help Advertising The Brahmaputra is flowing above its danger mark in Guwahati, at Nimatighat in Jorhat, Tezpur in Sonitpur, Goalpara and Dhubri towns, and at Badarpurghat in Karimganj.Burhidehing river is flowing above its danger mark at Khowang in Dibrugarh, Subansiri at Badatighat in Lakhimpur, Dhansiri river at Numaligarh in Golaghat, Jia Bharali at NT Road Crossing in Sonitpur, Kopili at Kampur and Dharamtul in Nagaon, Puthimari at NH road crossing in Kamrup, Beki at Road Bridge in Barpeta, Katakhal river at Matizuri in Hailakandi and Kushiyara river at Karimganj town, the ASDMA said.It said 3,181 villages were under water and 87,607 hectares of crop areas had been damaged. Authorities are running 327 relief camps and distribution centres in 24 districts, where 16,596 people are taking shelter at present.Embankments, roads, bridges, culverts and infrastructure have been damaged at various places in Sonitpur, Golaghat, Jorhat, Baksa, Dibrugarh, Nalbari, Hojai, Morigaon, Lakhimpur, Darrang, Nagaon, Kamrup, Barpeta, Dhubri, Majuli, Karimganj, Sivasagar, Hailakandi and South Salmara. Assam, Assam floods, Assam floods death toll, Assam flood news, Assam weather, Assam news, Assam rain news, Assam floods update, Assam update, Assam floods army, Baksa, Baksa assam, Assam floods, indian express, latest news Kamrup: People stand on a damaged embankment washed out by the floods due to incessant rainfalls, at Hajo in Kamrup. (PTI)The flood situation in Assam worsened on Sunday with the death toll rising to 11 and affecting nearly 26.5 lakh people across 28 districts. Assam floods: Over 26 lakh people affected, PM Modi assures CM of assistance Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Massive erosions have been witnessed at several places of Udalguri, Barpeta and Sonitpur districts, the ASDMA said.“For repairing embankments, 168 proposals worth Rs 250 crore were approved after last year’s flood,” Krishna said. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Snapchat May Risk Connecting Apps Despite Facebook Uproar

first_imgThe Cambridge Analytica controversy sprang from the use of an old version of Facebook’s Connected Apps API, which had a “friends permission” feature that let third-party developers collect users’ data without their consent or knowledge.Through a personality test developed by Cambridge University academic Aleksandr Kogan, Cambridge Analytica managed to obtain data on 50 million Facebook members without their knowledge or consent.Although the app was installed by just 270,000 users, the “friends permission” feature allowed access to the data of tens of millions of their friends. “The advantage — and disadvantage — of social apps like Snapchat and Facebook is that they rely on user traffic and data to make money, and for their stock valuation,” Rebecca Wettemann, vice president of research at Nucleus Research, told TechNewsWorld.Snapchat needs to make money. Its return on capital following last year’s IPO was -45.02 percent, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence, which indicated the company had a nearly 1 in 20 chance of default.”Access to data on user behavior is key to targeted advertising,” said Michael Jude, research manager at Stratecast/Frost & Sullivan.”The name of the game in social media is monetizing user data creatively,” he told TechNewsWorld. Third-party access “is one way, but this is a sensitive area, and Snapchat needs to avoid irritating its users while disclosing enough information to make a third party willing to pay for it.”Congress has invited Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, along with the leaders of Google and Twitter, to testify April 10.United States Representative Bobby L. Rush earlier this week introduced the “Data Accountability and Trust Act.”Facebook also faces several lawsuits — brought by states, investors and users — over the Cambridge Analytica issue.Facebook shut down its “Partner Categories” feature, which lets third-party data providers offer targeting directly on Facebook, earlier this week.None of this is going to help Snapchat, which is in trouble. It recently redesigned its platform to separate social content from media content, and it laid off 120 engineers.The new format is bad for advertisers because users can just avoid ads, observed Trip Chowdhry, managing director of equity research at Global Equities Research.”Snap lacks user data, hence ad targeting will always remain challenging,” he wrote in a research note. “Its ad targeting will always remain imprecise because it doesn’t have interest, social or activity graphs, so it “will struggle to acquire advertisers.” Richard Adhikari has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2008. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile technologies, CRM, databases, software development, mainframe and mid-range computing, and application development. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including Information Week and Computerworld. He is the author of two books on client/server technology. Email Richard. Snap either should create the API or delete it completely, suggested Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the Enderle Group.”There’s a lot of nervousness right now about third-party apps, and the concern they were used to manipulate not only the U.S. election but also Brexit,” he told TechNewsWorld. “Leaving a blank page isn’t a good idea because folks will fill the page with their imaginations.”However, killing the API would impact Snapchat’s ability to monetize, Frost’s Jude pointed out.If Snap should decide to retain the feature, it could safeguard user data and ensure user privacy by abstracting the base data to a metadata set, he noted.”Providing access only to sanitized and masked data is a good approach,” Jude remarked. “In other words, you can know about me, but you can’t know who I am.” How Facebook Got in Troublecenter_img Fear and Loathing on the API Trail The Root of Social Media Evil Snapchat soon may have a Connected Apps feature that is similar to the functionality at the heart of the Cambridge Analytica brouhaha, which has Facebook writhing under congressional scrutiny and consumer backlash.The latest beta features a new Connected Apps tab within the setting page, Mashable reported earlier this week.The page displays the following text: “These apps are connected to your Snapchat account. Choose an app to control what it has access to.”Snapchat already allows Bitmoji and Shazam apps to connect directly to users’ Snapchat accounts.It’s not clear whether Snapchat actually plans to implement the feature, given the heat Facebook has drawn. Further, it’s not clear how similar it might be to Facebook’s Connected Apps API.last_img read more

Gadget Ogling Rolling Records Designing Lawns and Placated Phones

first_imgWelcome to Gadget Dreams and Nightmares, the column that’s stopped shaking its head in disbelief that it’s actually December long enough to cast an analytical gaze over the latest gadget announcements.On the last page of the calendar are a portable record player, a device to craft designs into lawns, and a bed for your phone. Yes, you read that last part correctly. I can’t imagine that I’d use RokBlok outside of my home in any case, but it seems like it’d be a fun little party trick. Just make sure to ask your host’s permission before you run RokBlok over the top of their prized first-run Japanese copy of Thriller.Rating: 3 out of 5 Into the Grooves Vinyl Vehicle As ever, these are not reviews, partly because I’m not so sure a delivery truck can make it through the snow we’re already getting in my part of the world. The ratings relate only to how much I’d like to try each item. RokBlok is a portable record player without a turntable. It’s a block that dashes around the top of your records, and uses both its needle and built-in speaker to soundtrack your day.All you need to operate it are your records and a flat surface. If you’d like higher quality audio, you can connect it to your Bluetooth speaker or headphones.It’s designed with protecting your records in mind, as it has rubber wheels and the center of gravity isn’t on the needle itself. That should help prevent RokBlok from widening the grooves and help you enjoy your records for years to come. Still, I’d be reluctant to trust it completely with the rarer, more expensive records in my collection.RokBlok is expected to retail at US$99, though its crowdfunding backers can get one for $59 as a campaign reward. That seems a fair price for something you’re unlikely to use as your main record player, especially if you’re a conscientious audiophile.That you’d need to cart along a Bluetooth speaker to make it more useful — unless you’re wearing headphones — means it’s a little less portable than I’d like. Smartphone Slumber Y-art Workcenter_img The effect is neat — temporary artwork that washes away as soon as you roll the grass back into place. The demo video for Grassffiti doesn’t make it seem like the device leaves the clearest or most detailed images, so I imagine it would leave a stronger impact when creating larger-scale images, which are created by breaking them down into smaller sections.Grassffiti is not available to the public, which is a shame, as it could provide some additional color to homes everywhere without having to annoy landlords or neighbors with drastic landscaping changes.Rating: 4 out of 5 Turf Techniques I probably should give more care to my phone than I do. I’ve no idea how the screen’s still intact, because I’ve dropped it at least once a week in the year I’ve owned it. The least I can do is make sure my gateway to the world gets a good night’s rest, especially since it’s the first thing I reach for in the morning.To that end, I am ever-so-slightly considering bringing the Phone Bed into my home. It’s a little silly, all things considered, but I wonder if making sure our phones are well protected before putting ourselves to sleep is such a bad thing.I can picture doing so and feeling a mite more relaxed. It’s from Arianna Huffington’s new company, Thrive Global, which promotes well-being and healthy sleep, so it’s certainly on brand. Kris Holt is a writer and editor based in Montreal. He has written for the Daily Dot, The Daily Beast, and PolicyMic, among others. He’s Scottish, so would prefer if no one used the word “soccer” in his company. You can connect with Kris on Google+. The bed’s surface has room for multiple phones, and two spaces inside the frame for tablets. It can charge up to 10 devices at once, so it’s designed for the whole family to make use of. However, to get the full restfulness effect, you’ll need to leave the Phone Bed outside of your bedroom and turn off your devices, which might prove complicated if you use them as alarm clocks.At the very least, the Phone Bed would prove a good way to make sure I always leave my phone in the same place when not in use. Better that than having to scramble through the sheets of my own bed trying to find it.Rating: 3 out of 5 Sleep Tights What better way to add a little temporary flair to the facade of your home and grounds than with a design of your choosing on your lawn?Grassffiti, which is clearly not a name its creators came up with while inebriated (try saying it out loud after a few tipples), is the brainchild of University of Tokyo researchers. It’s a lawnmower that brushes blades of grass in different directions to create a visible image. It’s a similar technique to the one used on sports fields to give a striped effect to the grass, but it’s a little more refined and detailed.last_img read more

Heat and reapplication impact different sunscreen products containing common ingredients

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 8 2018With the growing awareness of ultraviolet (UV) exposure resulting in an increased risk of photoaging and skin cancers, consumers are using higher sun protection factor (SPF) sunscreens with frequent reapplication. New research, Evaluation of Reapplication and Controlled Heat Exposure on Oxybenzone Permeation from Commercial Sunscreen Using Excised Human Abdominal Skin, presented today at the 2018 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) PharmSci 360 Meeting demonstrates that heat and reapplication influences different sunscreen products containing the same amount of a key ingredient, oxybenzone, potentially affecting safety and toxicity of the UV filters included in sunscreens.”What our research shows is that current safety testing procedures may be underestimating the amount of oxybenzone being absorbed into the skin considering heat and reapplication, such as someone sunbathing on the beach,” said presenting author, Paige Zambrana, a pharmaceutical sciences graduate student at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. “Although sunscreens are intended for the entire body under higher temperatures with reapplication every 80 minutes, safety testing for setting UV filter limits only require single dose testing under baseline skin temperature of 32 degrees Celsius.”The researchers performed in vitro permeation tests, which indicated that oxybenzone, using lotion and spray sunscreen formulations, was able to permeate human skin with significantly higher cumulative permeation occurring from the lotion. With the addition of 24-hour heat exposure on the lotion, there was a 2.1-fold increase in cumulative permeation of oxybenzone when comparing sunscreen reapplication at 80 min and 160 min, to a single application and a 1.2-fold increase in permeation when comparing 24-hour heat application to 24-hour baseline temperature sunscreen reapplication studies. When comparing formulations, applying lotion with 24-hour heat and reapplication significantly increased the cumulative oxybenzone permeation 3.1-fold more than the spray reapplication.Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CT”Although sunscreen use is important and generally safe, our work suggests that some additional preclinical and clinical safety testing parameters should be considered before maximum UV filter levels are established,” noted Audra Stinchcomb, Ph.D., principal investigator and professor of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. “Also, given oxybenzone’s potential environmental hazards and recently being banned in Hawaii, we are focused on how different factors affect people to provide accurate predictions of total oxybenzone absorption.”The next stage of this work will examine sunscreen use through controlled in vitro and in vivo testing procedures with the eventual aim of establishing an in vitro-in vivo correlation between the two tests. In addition, clinical trials with currently marketed sunscreen products will be performed to assess sunscreen use conditions allowing for a better understanding of the current maximum absorption of oxybenzone.Evaluation of Reapplication and Controlled Heat Exposure on Oxybenzone Permeation from Commercial Sunscreen Using Excised Human Abdominal Skin will be presented Wednesday, Nov. 7, 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. (EST) Poster Forum 5 the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. Source:https://www.aaps.org/homelast_img read more

Vilcek Foundation prizes awarded to immigrants for their work on human biology

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 8 2019The Vilcek Foundation is pleased to announce the winners of the 2019 Vilcek Foundation Prizes for Biomedical Science, awarded to immigrants who have made significant contributions to the field. Dr. Angelika Amon will receive the $100,000 Vilcek Prize, while Drs. Amit Choudhary, Jeanne T. Paz, and Mikhail G. Shapiro will each receive the $50,000 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise.”Immigrant scientists are behind some of the most transformative discoveries made on American soil, as epitomized by the winners of the Vilcek Foundation Prizes,” says Jan Vilcek, Chairman and CEO of the Vilcek Foundation. “Their work has extraordinary implications for our understanding of human biology and our prospects for treating human disease.”The Vilcek Prize, awarded to individuals with records of significant accomplishment, is bestowed to Austrian-born molecular and cell biologist Angelika Amon, the Kathleen and Curtis Marble professor of cancer research and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Amon studies cell growth and division, and how errors in these processes contribute to birth defects and cancer. Her research has identified molecular, protein, and spatial signals crucial to triggering progression in cell division, as well as how certain errors in cell division, a state called aneuploidy, lead to disorders like Down syndrome. Amon has also illuminated the interplay between aneuploidy and cancer cells, increasing the potential for new treatments capable of selectively targeting cancer cells. Among other honors, Amon has been elected into the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the European Molecular Biology Organization, and received the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences and the Ernst Jung Prize for Medicine.The Vilcek Prizes for Creative Promise are awarded to emerging biomedical scientists who have shown exceptional promise early in their careers. The recipients are the following:Amit Choudhary’s research lies at the intersection of physics, biology, and chemistry. He identified a fundamental force integral to the structures of biomolecules like proteins and nucleic acids, opening up avenues for new modes of drug design and delivery, as well as insight into molecules tied to the origin of life. He refined controls for the genome-editing enzyme CRISPR-Cas9 to minimize unintended effects, increasing its potential for treating genetic disorders and curbing vector-borne diseases. His research on binge-eating snakes led to insights on insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells, suggesting possible therapeutic approaches for human diabetes. Choudhary, born in India, is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, a member of the Renal Division faculty at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and an associate member of Broad Institute.Related StoriesNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’Sugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyJeanne T. Paz uses optogenetics, a technique in which light is used to control genetically modified brain cells in living animals, to understand the brain mechanisms underlying epileptic seizures in rodent models. Her work revealed the role of the basal ganglia and thalamus in mediating seizures with a genetic underpinning, as well as those following stroke-induced brain damage. Her research forms the potential basis for predicting and arresting seizures, even in cases of intractable epilepsy, with implications for treating brain disorders such as dementia as well. Paz, born in Georgia (then part of the Soviet Union), is an assistant investigator at the Gladstone Institutes and assistant professor at the University of California, San Francisco.Mikhail G. Shapiro developed a new class of noninvasive imaging tools to visualize molecules and structures in living organisms at high resolution. Shapiro fashioned sensors allowing magnetic resonance imaging to visualize clinically relevant molecules, like dopamine, which play a role in various brain disorders. Then, he coopted structures known as gas vesicles, a biological feature in certain bacteria, to serve as ultrasound sensors; Shapiro also demonstrated that these and other biomolecules could be used to monitor and manipulate genetically engineered microbes, allowing for their greater potential as therapeutic drugs. Shapiro was born in Russia (then part of the Soviet Union), and is a professor of chemical engineering at the California Institute of Technology.The prizewinners were selected by independent panels of biomedical experts. In addition to biomedical science, the 2019 Vilcek Foundation Prizes also recognize immigrant contributions in culinary arts and art history. The prizewinners will be honored at a gala at the Mandarin Oriental in New York in spring 2019.The Vilcek Foundation was established in 2000 by Jan and Marica Vilcek, immigrants from the former Czechoslovakia. The mission of the foundation, to honor the contributions of immigrants to the United States and to foster appreciation of the arts and sciences, was inspired by the couple’s careers in biomedical science and art history, as well as their appreciation for the opportunities they received as newcomers to this country. The foundation awards annual prizes to immigrant biomedical scientists and artists, sponsors cultural programs, and manages the Vilcek Foundation Art Collections. Source:https://www.vilcek.org/news/press-release/immigrant-scientists-lead-charge-in-understanding-human-biology.htmllast_img read more

GARP protein can be a potential target for immunotherapy against colorectal cancer

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 19 2019Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women. Despite significant advances in therapies for this particular cancer, the five-year survival rate is 12 percent, according to the American Cancer Society.Immunotherapies have emerged as a promising treatment for many cancers and are effective against melanoma, lung cancer, and renal cell carcinoma. These immunotherapies include checkpoint therapies such as PD-1 inhibitors, which help activate the immune system against the cancer.Despite the promise these immunotherapies hold, clinical trials involving PD-1 inhibitors have been disappointing against colorectal cancer. Further, only a subset of colorectal cancer patients with certain mutations seem to respond well to anti-PD-1 therapy.In an article published in the March issue of Cancer Research, Zihai Li, M.D., Ph.D., and his team at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) report a potential new target for immunotherapy directed against colorectal cancer.Like PD-1, GARP is a protein expressed on the surface of our immune cells. Li and his team hope that targeting this protein could be a potential therapy for colorectal cancer patients who do not respond to other immunotherapies.”In terms of cancer therapy, the immune system has so many buttons you can push,” says Li. “PD-1 checkpoint therapy is an example of that. Researchers are constantly looking for more buttons to push, and I think that GARP could be one of those buttons.”Li is chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at MUSC and co-leads the cancer immunology research program at MUSC Hollings Cancer Center.An important balance exists within the immune system. While we need our immune system to protect us against diseases like cancer, we also need regulatory mechanisms to keep it from attacking our body. Collectively, these are known as tolerance.Cancer takes advantage of tolerance mechanisms to hide from our immune system. T cells are a type of immune cell that can target and kill cancer cells. However, they can come in many different flavors. One flavor, called a regulatory T (Treg) cell, makes sure we maintain tolerance to our own cells. Cancer cells can increase the presence of Treg cells in order to avoid being killed off by other types of T cells.Li and his lab have always been interested in how Tregs can be regulated both in terms of tolerance and in disease states like cancer. The research team led by Li found that disrupting GARP, a cell surface receptor on T regulatory cells, decreases tolerance, reduces colon cancer development, and inhibits migration of Treg cells to the gut in a preclinical model.Related StoriesResearchers identify potential drug target for multiple cancer typesStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patients”Fundamentally we shed some light on basic T regulatory cell biology,” explains Li. “We found that GARP, specifically that on T regulatory cells, is important for immune tolerance. It also seems to be involved in immune evasion by cancers in the gut.”The MUSC team showed that, in a mouse model of colitis, genetic deletion of GARP on Treg cells prevented the immune system from maintaining optimal tolerance in the gut. Without GARP, the Treg cells could no longer efficiently suppress the immune system and fewer of them traveled to the gut. Further, the team showed that deleting GARP on Treg cells in a mouse model of colon cancer diminished tumors by half compared with mice with intact GARP.”In our preclinical cancer model, mice with no GARP on their Treg cells had a better outcome, and more T cells infiltrated the tumor,” says Li. “Interestingly, this only seems to be the case in the gut. When we induced cancer in other places like the skin, there was no difference between mice with or without GARP on Treg cells.”Another major player involved in the regulation of Treg cells is TGF-beta. TGF-beta is released by cells and can regulate different parts of the immune system. It is known that GARP is involved in TGF-beta activation. Li’s work indicates that GARP and TGF-beta work together to regulate Treg migration to the gut.If researchers can figure out how colon cancer cells increase Treg homing to the gut, they could block that homing signal. That would enable the immune system to find and eradicate the cancer.Li and the research team found CD103, a cell surface protein, to be that homing signal.”When GARP is expressed on the surface of Treg cells, it can grab TGF-beta that’s secreted from other cells,” explains Li. “This causes an upregulation in CD103 expression, which acts like a zip code to the gut for Treg cells.”Ultimately, the MUSC’s team is the first to show the role that GARP plays in regulating the activity of Treg cells in the colon. Their next steps will be to characterize the presence of GARP on Treg cells in human colon cancer, as GARP can be therapeutically targeted.”It turns out that colon cancer patients have high levels of TGF-beta, which upregulates Treg cells”, says Li. “This may be one of the reasons why they don’t respond to PD-1 therapy. However, these could be the patients that anti-GARP therapy could work really well on.”Source: https://web.musc.edu/last_img read more

Reducing smoking among Medicaid recipients by 1 could result in 26 billion

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 12 2019Reducing smoking, and its associated health effects, among Medicaid recipients in each state by just 1 percent would result in $2.6 billion in total Medicaid savings the following year, according to new research by UC San Francisco.The median state would save $25 million, ranging from $630.2 million in California (if the smoking rate dropped from 15.5 percent to 14.5 percent) to $2.5 million in South Dakota (if the rate dropped from 41.3 to 40.3 percent), the research found.The study, by Stanton A. Glantz, PhD, director of the UCSF Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, is published April 12, 2019 in JAMA Network Open.”While 14 percent of all adults in the U.S. smoke cigarettes, 24.5 percent of adult Medicaid recipients smoke,” said Glantz. “This suggests that an investment in reducing smoking in this population could be associated with a reduction in Medicaid costs in the short run.”Related StoriesStudy finds increase in cigarette smoking among minority teens after college affirmative action bansPrenatal exposure to paternal tobacco smoking linked to high asthma riskStudy: Smoking does not shorten the length of telomeresTotal Medicaid costs in 2017 were $577 billion.”There is no question that reducing smoking is associated with reduced health costs, but it’s commonly assumed that it takes years to see these savings, which has discouraged many states from prioritizing helping smokers quit,” said Glantz.”While this is true for some diseases, such as cancer, other health risks such as heart attacks, lung disease and pregnancy complications respond quickly to changes in smoking behavior. So reducing the prevalence of smoking would be an excellent short-term investment in the physical health of smokers and the fiscal health of the Medicaid system,” he said.Glantz derived state-by-state percentages of Medicaid recipients who smoke based on data from the 2017 Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System, which provides the percentage of smokers among the population of each state, and the 2017 National Health Interview Survey, which identifies Medicaid recipients in four major regions in the United States (Northeast, Midwest, South and West).He then estimated potential Medicaid savings based on a previous research finding which showed that a 1 percent relative reduction in smoking prevalence is associated with a reduction of 0.118 percent in per capita health care spending.Glantz noted that the study looked only at the potential savings from reducing the total number of Medicaid recipients who smoke. But even if each smoker just smoked less, there would be additional reductions in health care costs, he said.Cost reductions from reducing smoking would continue and likely grow over the long term.”Because some health risks linked with smoking, such as cancer, can take years to fully manifest, these savings would be likely to grow with each passing year,” Glantz said.The paper shows predicted reductions in Medicaid costs by each state. Source:https://www.ucsf.edu/last_img read more