Mardi Gras pickleball tournament held in Red Bluff

first_imgRed Bluff >> Betsy Palubeski hosted the first Mardi Gras Pickleball Tournament Feb. 11 at the Lincoln Street tennis courts. Sixteen players participated and LeRoy Weighall was the tournament director.The winning team was made up of Cathy D’Ulisse, Diane Tucci, Kateland Weighall and Rita Weighall.Other players included Jody Johnson, Nora Sabhlok, Carmel Growney, Missy Dominick, Chelsea Kingston, Kathleen Farren, Betsy Palubeski, Mary Jacobson, Betty Lasley, Sherrie Weigle, Michele Gunsauls …last_img

Thinking of the farm as a business

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Corn and bean basis has remained strong, or even slightly improved for April delivery, even with the recent futures rally. This likely indicates limited farmer selling and/or good demand. It’s been a while since we’ve seen this type of market situation, and it suggests potentially higher prices going forward.I expect the 2018 marketing year to be much different than 2017, but I have my plan in place ready to take advantage of opportunities that become available. In order to do this effectively, it’s imperative to know my breakeven price. Several Midwest universities have published their corn and bean breakeven cost structures for various farmers across the Midwest. While I may disagree with a few line items on their budgets, their overall numbers are values that I think is a reasonable level for the average farmer to use as a goal for their own budgets. Thinking of the farm as a businessI suggest that farmers look at their farm operation as a large company with multiple profit centers working to a common goal. Each profit center must “pull its own weight” without drawing profits from other divisions. Successful farmers understand each profit center independently and how it maximizes profit for the farm operation.There are four large divisions (some with smaller subsets) that I look at:Land ownershipCustom machine operationsGrain storage facilityFarmer. Land ownershipSince farmers are naturally passionate about working the land, this is where I see the most “cheating.” I ask all my clients, “Are you paying yourself a fair market rental price for use of your own land?” In theory, some farmers could spend all of their time on the beach, while renting out all of their farmland. Considering the typical farmer’s mentality, few think like this, but they should. The most successful operations understand the profit from land ownership comes from a long-term investment.This long-term investment could have been made when the land was purchased 20 years ago at cheaper values or recently at higher prices. Either way there is a fair market rental price based upon the local market conditions for every farm out there. From the start of budget preparations this rental value needs to be calculated to understand the possible guaranteed income a farmer is giving up in order to actually farm their own landFarmers frequently tell me that if they figured the fair market rental prices for land they have owned for 20 years that they won’t make a profit on all the other land that they rent. If so, this might indicate other divisions within their operation are not as efficient as they should be. Or it could simply mean the farmer might be paying too much for the additional rented ground.Sometimes farmers say they need to adjust prices based upon entire farms instead of field by field. While there are two schools of thought on this subject, I tend to think each farm, not field, should stand on its own. There will always be a field or two that aren’t necessarily profitable within a group of fields rented from each landowner, but it can be justified as long as that entire farm makes up for those few loser fields. However, the balance of the other farms in the operation shouldn’t subsidize any other farm in any operation in my opinion. Custom operationsProfitable farmers also understand the cost of every piece of equipment. Most mid-sized farmers today could have over $1 million invested in equipment, so it’s important to be as efficient as possible. Following are questions that should be asked of every piece of equipment (i.e. planter, combine, sprayer, semi, tractor, etc.)What is the local custom rate for each piece of equipment you need if hired done?What is the yearly maintenance cost for each piece of equipment needed (e.g. 5 year avg)?What are the yearly depreciation costs?Is there profit potential in owning equipment and doing custom hire work?Is owning, renting, leasing or hiring another farmer a better option? Bankers always include depreciation in their budget estimates, but farmers tend to disregard it because it’s not an actual cash expense each year. I too have always hated this line item because it doesn’t reflect anything tangible and is too easy to “fudge.”Often farmers will “mine” the equity on their equipment by not paying themselves enough per acre to use it and replace it. This may be fine for a short time, but years later replacing equipment becomes too expensive, potentially leaving the farmer in a difficult position down the road. This is where the depreciation that should have been budgeted in each year catches up with a farmer.That’s why I prefer to use custom rates in my budget instead of loans, depreciation, repairs, fuel and labor independently. Putting more acres on machines doesn’t usually decrease one’s overall cost per acre much, if all these expenses are included the costs are still about the same. For example, think of two identical used combines except one has 1,000 more hours on it. No one would value those two combines at the same price because there is always a cost to using equipment beyond just fuel and labor.When a farmer tells me they can’t make a profit using university breakeven levels using custom equipment rates, I’m concerned. Without a significant rally, this farmer will have a difficult time being profitable. Usually farmers in this situation are paying very high land rents are likely not accounting for true equipment costs. Although I have seen situations where a small farmers might not have enough acres to warrant a purchase of some or maybe even all of their equipment. Grain storageGrain storage is a profit center many producers use incorrectly. Most farmers store non-contracted grain, hoping for a market rally, because storing unpriced grain at their local elevator means hefty charges. Between storing unpriced grain at home for “free” or storing it at an elevator for a charge, it can make a little sense I guess.However, many farmers are missing out on all of the profitable benefits of storing grain at home while selling forward to take advantage of carry and basis appreciation. By considering on-farm grain storage as a separate cost center, analyzing the expense to build new storage becomes a practical one. One just needs to analyze the premiums received from carry and basis optimization against the expense of building new bins. Almost every time I walk a client through the numbers, having on-farm grain storage is a profitable venture. Actually, I find grain storage can have the best return on investment above every other investment in a farm operation. FarmerThe “farmer” is the part of you that makes management decisions each year. It’s similar to a CEO position with strategic decisions that need to be made on crop inputs and farm operations:Fertilizer — What kind? How much? When to apply?Chemicals — What kind? How much? When to apply?Seed/agronomy — How much corn vs. beans? On which fields? Which brands/hybrids/traits?Insurance — How much? What program?Hired help — How much? Where do I find these people? How much to pay?Marketing — When to sell. Was that a profitable price? What I too greedy in my goal?Strategic planning — Should I rent or buy more ground? Should I drop a low producing field?There are so many decisions for farmers to make it can sometimes be overwhelming. To help in budgeting, I ask my clients: “How much do you want to make on each acre they farm?” Each farm is different and has its own challenges, but these questions should be answered by not only the big established family farms but also the small young farmers renting all of their land. Putting it together Finally, the farmer puts all of these profit centers together to form a budget (or business plan, but farmers don’t usually call it that). Then a marketing plan can be developed to try and ensure the farm is profitable. If each profit center is optimized, the biggest opportunities for the farm operation can be achieved.Some may think all of this is just part of being a farmer, but breaking up the divisions/profit centers independently and then optimizing each one can help maximize profits. Perhaps there is a weak division/profit center that was only exposed after doing the analysis. Farmers can then take steps to maximize each area. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at jon@superiorfeed.com.last_img read more

Solar Thermal Is Really, Really Dead

first_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Back in early 2012, in an article called “Solar Thermal Is Dead,” I announced that “it’s now cheaper to heat water with a photovoltaic array than solar thermal collectors.”Now that almost three years have passed, it’s worth revisiting the topic. In the years since that article was written, the cost to install a photovoltaic (PV) system has dropped significantly. Moreover, I’ve come across monitoring data that allow for a more accurate estimate of the amount of electricity needed to heat water with electric resistance elements or a heat pump.First, I’ll present my assumptions.In my earlier article, I estimated that a residential solar thermal system with two 4′ by 8′ collectors and a solar storage tank with a capacity in the range of 80 to 120 gallons costs between $8,000 to $10,000 to install. I stand by that estimate.Of course, some contractors can beat this price, while others will charge significantly more. (In a recent comment posted on GBA, an Ohio-based solar contractor named Daniel Young estimated that the solar thermal system I describe would cost $16,250.) For the purposes of the comparisons made in this article, I’ll assume that the installed cost of a residential solar thermal system is $9,000.My calculations are based on a PV system cost of $3.74/watt. The figure comes from a the “Solar Market Insight Report 2014 Q2” published by the Solar Energy Industries Association.Some GBA readers have received quotes of $3.50/watt for a PV system, while others are still paying $4.00/watt or more. One thing’s for sure: prices for PV are still dropping.The price comparisons made in this article do not include any incentives, rebates, or tax credits.The easiest way to figure out how many kWh will be produced each year by a PV system is to use a free online… center_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more

The Mike Gundy Press Conference Bingo Card

first_imgHere it is, the long-awaited Mike Gundy Bingo card. Carson Cunningham and Kyle Porter came up with most of the phrases with some assists from PFB contributors (most notably Kyle Cox) and a few folks on Twitter (thank you!)Hope you enjoy playing along during Mike Gundy pressers for the rest of the year.gundy-bingoIf you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img

MiraCosta College waives tuition for all firsttime fulltime students

first_img KUSI Newsroom MiraCosta College waives tuition for all first-time, full-time students KUSI Newsroom, OCEANSIDE (KUSI) – MiraCosta College announced Monday that tuition will be fully waived for first-time full-time students as part of the MiraCosta Promise program.The promise program is funded by private donations to the MiraCosta College Foundation and a variety of state and local entities. Along with the waiving of tuition, students who graduated from a high school within the community college’s district — MiraCosta serves coastal North San Diego County through its main campus in Oceanside, at 1 Barnard Drive, and San Elijo campus in Cardiff-by-the-Sea –can receive up to $1,000 for textbooks and other supplies if eligible.“Promise aims to remove a significant hurdle for college-bound students; tuition, mandatory fees and textbook costs for eligible full-time students,” said MiraCosta Superintendent and President Sunita Cooke. “Promise is boosting transfer and certificate attainment rates, improving academic performance and expanding higher education access to underserved populations.”MiraCosta waived tuition for nearly 500 students for the 2017-18 school year, the first year of the Promise program, according to the college. MiraCosta aims to cover two full years of tuition and fees for qualifying students in the near future. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: August 20, 2018 August 20, 2018last_img read more

Hearst Establishes Health Division

first_imgThe new auxiliary company will also support two major extensions: Hearst Health Ventures and the Hearst Health Innovation Lab. Combined, the lab and venture fund have $75 million committed to investing in startups and another $75 million set aside for future funding opportunities, according to Hearst.Hearst Health Ventures, steered by managing director Ellen Koskinas, is a new fund created to invest in startup companies focused on health IT solutions and technology-enabled healthcare services. The Hearst Innovation Lab, under the guidance of chief innovation officer Justin Graham, will support internally-developed projects, as well as work with outside clinician-entrepreneurs, rapidly prototyping new product ideas with a team of analysts, developers and data architects. The Hearst healthcare network maintains a strong presence in the clinical, pharmacy, home and hospice care and health insurance markets. The company claims to provide services for more than 75 percent of patients discharged from U.S. hospitals, 20 million patient home visits and more than $3.25 billion prescription claims yearly.This success has helped elevate Hearst Business Media to become the company’s second-biggest moneymaker after the entertainment and syndication group, which includes partnerships with ESPN and A&E Networks. Unlike the changing winds of the magazines and newspaper industry, Hearst can rely on growth prospects in the healthcare sector.“Hearst has been operating in the healthcare information industry since 1980,” says Richard P. Malloch, president of Hearst Business Media, in a release. “Through Hearst Health Ventures and the Innovation Lab, we will advance businesses that provide more scalable and cost-effective solutions for high-quality patient care.” [This article first appeared on FOLIO: sister site min.] Hoping to elevate its presence in the healthcare information marketplace, the Hearst Corporation, which has operated in the sector since 1980, launched Hearst Health, a subsidiary of Hearst Business Media, on Monday.The five healthcare information companies now consolidated under the Hearst Health umbrella include pharmaceutical database publisher First Databank (FDB), Zynx Health, a clinical decision support solutions company, MCG Health (previously Milliman Care Guidelines), which produces best practices for health systems and insurance companies, homecare and hospice market software-as-solutions provider Homecare Homebase and the Web-based Map of Medicine patient care comparison system.“The care guidance we provide is next generation of clinical decision support,” says Gregory Dorn, MD, executive vice president of Hearst Business Media, in a statement. “In addition to best practices, it encompasses efficiency of care and resource planning.” last_img read more

5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday May 16 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Thursday, May 16, 2019:#1) Wilmington Middle School Jazz Band Concert At LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting the WMS Jazz Band at 2:30pm. The Wilmington Middle School Jazz Band under the direction of Anita DiLullo will perform a wonderful, heartfelt concert. Come enjoy the talent of Wilmington youth! Register HERE.#2) Drop-In MeditationThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding drop-in meditation at 12:30pm. If you’re interested in starting a meditation practice, join technology librarian, Brad McKenna, for his weekly drop-in meditation sessions. It will be a mixture of silent and guided meditations The Insight Timer app will be used so you can continue your practice at home.#3) Wilmington Elderly Services Commission MeetingThe Wilmington Elderly Services Commission meets at 1:30pm at the Senior Center. Read the agenda HERE.#4) Wilmington Water & Sewer Commission MeetingThe Wilmington Water & Sewer Commission meets at 5:30pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.#5) Tour Of Wilmington Town MuseumThe Town Museum (430 Salem Street) is open from 10am to 2pm. Come explore Wilmington’s history. Free admission.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, July 18, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, August 15, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, January 17, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Rescuers search for 8 climbers missing on Indian peak

first_imgThis file photo taken on 13 November 2015, shows a general view of the Himalayas from the hill-station of Kausani in the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand. Scores of emergency workers were battling bad weather Saturday to locate eight climbers missing on India`s second highest mountain, an official said. Photo: AFPScores of emergency workers were battling bad weather Saturday to locate eight climbers missing on India’s second highest mountain, an official said.Four Britons, two Americans, an Australian and an Indian were set to climb the 7,826-metre (25,643-foot) Nanda Devi East peak — near the border with China — and return to the base camp last weekend.But the group, led by British climber Martin Moran, who has successfully climbed the world’s 23rd highest peak several times in the past, failed to report back to the Munsiyari base camp after starting the ascent on 13 May.”We have activated resources to trace the climbers after they failed to return to the base camp, but bad weather is hindering the operation,” Vijay Kumar Jogdande, a magistrate in Pithoragarh district — where the peak is located — told AFP.A porter stationed at the base camp in the northern Himalayan state of Uttarakhand said the climbers failed to return on 26 May, prompting the search.Jogdande said heavy rains and snowfall in the region had lasted a week and hampered aerial surveillance.Teams are trekking to the base camp to trace the missing climbers and there was little information about their plans, he added.He said investigators were verifying a May 22 Facebook post by Moran, in which he hinted the group may scale a never-before-climbed peak in the trans-Himalayan region.Hundreds of climbers from across the world visit India to scale mountains located across the Himalayan belt.India has 10 peaks above 7,000-metres, including Kangchenjunga — the world’s third highest — sandwiched between India and Nepal.Four Indians were among 11 climbers that died climbing Mount Everest in the latest season that ended this week.last_img