Hearst Establishes Health Division

first_imgThe new auxiliary company will also support two major extensions: Hearst Health Ventures and the Hearst Health Innovation Lab. Combined, the lab and venture fund have $75 million committed to investing in startups and another $75 million set aside for future funding opportunities, according to Hearst.Hearst Health Ventures, steered by managing director Ellen Koskinas, is a new fund created to invest in startup companies focused on health IT solutions and technology-enabled healthcare services. The Hearst Innovation Lab, under the guidance of chief innovation officer Justin Graham, will support internally-developed projects, as well as work with outside clinician-entrepreneurs, rapidly prototyping new product ideas with a team of analysts, developers and data architects. The Hearst healthcare network maintains a strong presence in the clinical, pharmacy, home and hospice care and health insurance markets. The company claims to provide services for more than 75 percent of patients discharged from U.S. hospitals, 20 million patient home visits and more than $3.25 billion prescription claims yearly.This success has helped elevate Hearst Business Media to become the company’s second-biggest moneymaker after the entertainment and syndication group, which includes partnerships with ESPN and A&E Networks. Unlike the changing winds of the magazines and newspaper industry, Hearst can rely on growth prospects in the healthcare sector.“Hearst has been operating in the healthcare information industry since 1980,” says Richard P. Malloch, president of Hearst Business Media, in a release. “Through Hearst Health Ventures and the Innovation Lab, we will advance businesses that provide more scalable and cost-effective solutions for high-quality patient care.” [This article first appeared on FOLIO: sister site min.] Hoping to elevate its presence in the healthcare information marketplace, the Hearst Corporation, which has operated in the sector since 1980, launched Hearst Health, a subsidiary of Hearst Business Media, on Monday.The five healthcare information companies now consolidated under the Hearst Health umbrella include pharmaceutical database publisher First Databank (FDB), Zynx Health, a clinical decision support solutions company, MCG Health (previously Milliman Care Guidelines), which produces best practices for health systems and insurance companies, homecare and hospice market software-as-solutions provider Homecare Homebase and the Web-based Map of Medicine patient care comparison system.“The care guidance we provide is next generation of clinical decision support,” says Gregory Dorn, MD, executive vice president of Hearst Business Media, in a statement. “In addition to best practices, it encompasses efficiency of care and resource planning.” last_img read more

YouTubes whackamole approach to child safety isnt working critics say

first_img Comments Share your voice Google YouTube Alphabet Inc. 7 Tags Tech Industry Mobile Apps YouTube is facing a scandal involving child exploitation. Getty YouTube is under fire again for allowing content that exploits children onto its platform. After reports of a “softcore pedophile ring” on the Google-owned site surfaced last weekend, YouTube on Thursday said it’s taking aggressive action to fix the problem. The company banned more than 400 accounts and took down dozens of videos that put children at risk. But even though YouTube addressed this particular controversy, critics of the company say they’re fed up that problems with child safety keep arising in the first place. For example, two years ago, YouTube faced a backlash after disturbing videos got past filters on YouTube Kids, a version of the service designed for children.”This has been happening for years,” Haley Halverson, vice president of advocacy and outreach at the National Center on Sexual Exploitation, said in an email. “Why isn’t it YouTube’s No. 1 priority to create sustained solutions, instead of carrying on with its current whack-a-mole approach?”The latest incident began on Sunday, when a video blogger named Matt Watson detailed how pedophiles could enter a “wormhole” of YouTube videos to see footage of children in sexually suggestive positions. In the comments of those videos, users would post time stamps linking to other videos, and YouTube’s algorithms would recommend even more of those kinds of videos.  In response, advertisers including AT&T and Epic Games, maker of Fortnite, pulled ad spending from YouTube. YouTube declined to make an executive available for an interview, but in a statement a spokeswoman said: “Any content — including comments — that endangers minors is abhorrent and we have clear policies prohibiting this on YouTube … There’s more to be done, and we continue to work to improve and catch abuse more quickly.” But child advocacy groups say the company isn’t working fast enough. Not the first timeYouTube has a history of people abusing the service to exploit kids. In 2017, parents started noticing troubling videos appearing on YouTube Kids. One video showed Mickey Mouse in a pool of blood while Minnie looks on in horror. In another video, a claymation version of Spider-Man urinates on Elsa, the princess from “Frozen.” The videos were knockoffs depicting the beloved Disney and Marvel characters. Also that year, YouTube stoked controversy after sexually explicit comments appeared under videos of kids doing innocuous activities, like performing gymnastics.Outside the realm of child safety, advertisers that year also boycotted YouTube after their ads appeared next to extremist and hate content because of YouTube’s automated advertising technology. Major brands including AT&T and Johnson & Johnson ditched advertising on the platform.In response to those scandals, CEO Susan Wojcicki overhauled YouTube’s safety guidelines. The new rules included removing ads from inappropriate videos targeting families and blocking inappropriate comments on videos featuring minors. Two years later, critics are upset these incidents are still popping up. Josh Golin, executive director of the Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood, says the problem is YouTube treating the issue like a public relations problem and just dealing with individual controversies when they receive media attention, instead of getting at the root of the problem.Golin said it’s particularly egregious that YouTube’s recommendation algorithm suggested even more videos that put children at risk.”If you realize that your algorithm is recommending videos that would appeal to pedophiles and you’re not stopping to think about that, what will make you stop and think?” he said. “If pedophiles won’t make you look in the mirror, what will?” There are no easy fixes, he said. Part of that is because of YouTube’s massive scale. It’s the largest video site on the planet, with more than 1 billion visitors a month. “I don’t think you can provide a safe space for children if your business model is volume,” he said. last_img read more

Calling all Volunteers

first_imgDreams Girls Mentoring Program is recruiting for their fundraising, events, outreach, and program development committees. Volunteers may come 9:30 a.m. to noon, March 28 at the Towson Library, 320 York Road, to join the team.  For more information, email dreamgirls@gmail.com.last_img