ABM How New USPS Periodical Content Rules will Affect Publishers

first_imgEarlier this month, the United States Postal Service issued new rules covering supplements to periodicals, product samples in periodicals, and “novelty pages,” which are said to be effective by September 7.According to David Straus, American Business Media’s Washington counsel and postal expert, the most promising of the changes, for b-to-b publishers, is the elimination of the requirement that supplements must have 25 percent non-advertising content.  “That rule has caused many problems … especially when the supplement had a single sponsor and/or was prepared by a third party,” Straus wrote recently in an e-mail to ABM members. “With the elimination of this requirement, your advertising sales people ought to be able to sell more supplements and bring in significant new revenue.”This week, ABM released information about the rule changes and how exactly they should affect publishers. See below for the entire post: Changes to USPS Periodical Content Rules Affect PublishersABM’s ongoing effort to represent members’ best interests in Washington has included diligently monitoring the Postal Service’s decisions regarding supplements to periodicals, product samples in periodicals, and so-called “novelty pages.” ABM is pleased to present the new rules as they affect publishers.“These rules result from a too-long battle to obtain a loosening of these content standards in order to permit publishers to obtain additional, innovative advertising,” says David Straus, ABM’s Washington counsel and postal expert.Changes to the standards in this final rule concentrate on the four areas of pages, supplements, products, and mailpiece construction, which covers pieces without mailing wrappers, cover pages or protective covers.PagesIn response to a 1995 Postal Service ruling allowing publishers to fasten printed pages with grommets, string, and rubber bands—as well as with staples, saddle stitching, or spiral binding—while maintaining the USPS Periodicals shipping rate, publishers have argued that the rules “unduly limit creativity in designing publications that appeal to their readers and advertisers.” Citing technological advancements, publishers took issue with the fact that neither private shipping companies nor newsstands restrict sound devices or video components within a printed page, for example, while the USPS does.The Postal Service agreed and the recent decision changed the rule’s first sentence language from “fasten” to “non-paper” so that non-paper materials, in addition to fastening materials, would be accepted at the Periodicals rate; the language “Not all elements that make up a multilayer page must be printed” was inserted.“With the elimination of this requirement, your advertising sales people ought to be able to sell more supplements and bring in significant new revenue,” says Straus.SupplementsABM is pleased to announce that the 25 percent non-advertising material for supplements rule has been omitted “except for separately addressed loose supplements mailed with the host publication outside a wrapper or polybag.” This allows publishers more latitude in deciding where to place advertising.Product SamplesWhile the Postal Service continues to exclude products including stationery, cassettes, floppy disks, DVDs, and CDs from Periodicals rates, it now allows product samples in de minimis form to be included as part of a printed sheet.Further revised language includes (but is not limited to):■ Product samples may not be included in a Periodicals publication mailed at letter-sized prices.■ The combined weight of product samples in an issue of a Periodicals publication cannot exceed 3.3 ounces.■ Any product sample that is a “packet” is limited to a weight of no more than one ounce with a burst strength minimum of 3,000 pounds per square inch.Mailpiece ConstructionThe Postal Service rules on mailings without wrappers will be amended to allow a single sheet prepared as an attachment to be securely attached along the bound edge on the outside of an unwrapped publication, as long as the sheet does not exceed the dimensions of the cover, and allowing a 3/4-inch clearance of any open edge.Unwrapped pieces must have a cover page or protective cover that must cover both the front and back of the host publication and extend to within at least 3/4-inch of any open edge.Take Advantage NowAlthough the new rules are to be made effective on September 7, publishers may actually take advantage of them immediately by asking for an exception from the USPS’s Pricing and Classification Service Center, according to Straus.last_img read more

Inside Logics 18002738255 Suicide Prevention Song Mental Health Awareness Month

first_imgOne of the singles off his 2017 album Everybody, “1-800-273-8255,” leapt onto the music scene and brought the Maryland native to a whole new audience. Not just any phone number, 1-800-273-8255 happens to be the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, which offers services to those experiencing a mental health crisis, including suicidality.The song, which also features Alessia Cara and Khalid, poignantly captures a dialog between a suicidal hotline caller, the counselor on the other end of the phone and the resulting journey from feeling hopeless and alone to finding a little hope.Though suicide is the leading cause of death among 15–24 year olds, and it claims more than 38,000 lives each year, few artists tackle the subject head on in the way Logic did. He revealed during a visit to the Recording Academy’s Santa Monica, Calif., headquarters that he was inspired to write the song after he went on a tour around the country to meet his fans. Many told them his music had saved their lives.This got him thinking about not only the power of music to heal, but also how, as a society, we often don’t talk openly about mental health. Though he said it was hard to talk about topics such as suicide and anxiety, which is featured on another track on Everybody, “Anziety,” he knew it was vitally important.”I was so scared for so long to say that because society has lead me to believe that my anxiety is stupid and shouldn’t be talked about, or that suicide, ‘Who cares, who’s weak enough to kill themselves?’ Which is the most terrible, disgusting, ugly thing somebody can say,” Logic said. “That’s why I decided to write about these topics because I was scared to write about them. And since I was scared, I was like, ‘Well damn, it must mean it’s good.'”And it was good. “1-800-273-8255″ earned Logic his first two career GRAMMY nominations at the 60th GRAMMY Awards for Song Of The Year and Best Music Video. Logic, Cara and Khalid also gave a stunning performance during the 60th GRAMMYs telecast alongside real suicide attempt survivors, which had an even more profound impact: The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline received triple their normal volume of calls following the performance.For Logic, opening a dialog was also personally important because he has faced his own challenges with mental health.”I wrote these things from a selfless place in my heart because there’s so many people out there struggling, and I was struggling,” Logic shared. “My highest grossing year was my most unhappy year of my life because I was working myself to death.”Nowadays, Logic has been working to find a way to balance a high-pressure career with the things that matter in life. The advice that works best for him?”Balance yourself,” he says. “That’s what you have to do, and that’s what these songs are about.”Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read more NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO May 18, 2018 – 4:40 pm Logic’s Suicide Prevention With “1-800-273-8255” News The GRAMMY-nominated rapper shares why he overcame his fear about making music on difficult topicsRenée FabianGRAMMYs May 18, 2018 – 4:42 pm It’s been a big year for rapper Logic, and perhaps surprisingly, a lot of that comes down to his willingness to tackle the difficult subjects of mental health and suicide head on. Logic Tackles Mental Health, Suicide Prevention inside-logics-1-800-273-8255-suicide-prevention-song-mental-health-awareness-month Email Inside Logic’s “1-800-273-8255” Suicide Prevention Song | Mental Health Awareness Month Twitter Facebook last_img read more

Scientists discover Big Bang fossil hiding in space

first_img NASA InSight lander rocks its journey to Mars: A view in pictures 22 Photos CNET’s Holiday Gift Guide: The place to find the best tech gifts for 2018.NASA turns 60: The space agency has taken humanity farther than anyone else, and it has plans to go further. Sci-Tech 0 Post a comment NASA, ESA, STScI, and G. Piotto (Università degli Studi di Padova) and E. Noyola (Max Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik) The first stars in the universe are long gone, but their signatures may still be writ across space, buried in gas clouds like space fossils.And scientists believe they’ve uncovered one.Researchers at Swinburne University in Melbourne, Australia used their time at the W. M. Keck Observatory, home to two of the world’s most powerful telescopes, to go on an astro-archeological dig through space. They discovered a “pristine cloud of gas” in the distant universe, seemingly untouched by heavy elements, suggesting it may be a “fossil relic” of the Big Bang.Space fossilsHow do you find a fossil relic in space?Well, the universe has had quite a few birthdays — it’s some 13.7 billion years old. Over that time, a lot of stars have lived and died. At the end of a star’s life, it can sometimes explode, becoming a supernova. This massive explosion spews out a lot of waste heavy elements (metals), so generally when scientists look into space, they often find gas clouds murky with this material. Over 13.7 billion years, a lot of stars have exploded — so there’s a lot of waste in the clouds.Examining these gas clouds allows for scientists to gather insight on some of the earliest events in the universe. If the gas clouds are unspoiled by the waste, they may have existed in the infant universe. The research team think they’ve identified one that’s practically untouched by waste heavy elements.”Our inspiration is actually to find relics of the first stars in the universe,” said Prof. Michael Murphy, one of the lead researchers on the study. Gas clouds that are relics of the first stars would be “almost pristine”, according to Murphy, so there would still be traces of the heavy element waste within them.But the fossil relic they found had no detectable levels of waste — it was completely clean — suggesting it comes from the very early universe and has been untouched for 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang.”This discovery – a seemingly pristine cloud – is really important,” said Murphy. “We need to know whether such clouds can last billions of years without being polluted by multiple generations of stars.”Before this discovery, only two such gas clouds had been discovered — and those discoveries were mostly accidental. By actively seeking out the gas clouds and demonstrating that they are unspoiled by heavy elements, Murphy’s team has shown that it’s possible to go digging for them.”Now we’ve proven that we can systematically find such fossils, we really have a chance of knowing how rare or common they are,” said Murphy. “That’s crucial for testing our understanding of how the first galaxies formed.”The first starsIt’s not the first time these relic gas clouds have proven fruitful for Swinburne researchers. In 2016, the team discovered an “almost pristine” gas cloud using data from the Very Large Telescope in Chile.”It proved that trying to hunt for these clouds – and the completely pristine clouds like the one we’ve now discovered – in a targeted way was feasible and could, in principle, identify a “smoking gun” signature of the first stars,” said Murphy.However, there may be alternate explanations for why the gas cloud is so clean — and those explanations are exciting, too.One possibility is that the cloud is polluted by one of the universe’s first stars, leaving only traces of heavy elements, undetectable by the telescopes the team used. Another is that the gas cloud is moving through a galaxy for the very first time, so it has yet to be polluted by other stars just yet.”This is an exciting possibility because understanding how such gas clouds ‘feed’ galaxies is a major problem in astrophysics,” explained Murphy.”We’d like to test this possibility by mapping any galaxies near the cloud in future.”And so searching for the earliest signatures scribbled across the cosmos continues. Share your voice Tagslast_img read more

United Airlines manhandles passenger off flight

first_imgUnited Airlines planes on the tarmac at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, California. AFP file photoUnited Airlines found itself in the middle of a social media storm on Monday, after the US carrier forcefully removed a passenger from a flight due to overbooking.The incident occurred Sunday on a United Express flight bound for Louisville, Kentucky, from Chicago. United Express flights are operated by one of eight regional airlines which partner with United.The airline said it had asked for volunteers to give up their seats on the flight, and police were called after one passenger refused to leave the plane.Smartphone video posted online showed three Chicago Department of Aviation police officers struggling with a seated middle-aged man.The man started to scream as he is dragged off while other passengers looked on—some recording the event with their phones.One passenger can be heard yelling, “Oh my God, look at what you did to him!”The incident ignited social media outrage, with “United” a trending term on Twitter, Facebook and Google.It was another example of bad press and negative social media coverage for United, after an incident in late March when two teenage girls were denied boarding a flight in Denver because they wore leggings.The airline defended its action, saying the girls were flying on passes that require them to abide by a dress code in return for free or discounted travel.In Sunday’s incident, United told US media that it had asked for volunteers to leave the overbooked plane.“One customer refused to leave the aircraft voluntarily and law enforcement was asked to come to the gate,” United spokesman Charlie Hobart was quoted by the Chicago Tribune newspaper as saying.The airline did not return AFP’s request for comment.United Airlines chief executive Oscar Munoz addressed the latest controversy in a statement posted Monday on the airline’s website.“This is an upsetting event to all of us,” Munoz said, adding that the airline was conducting a “detailed review of what happened.”“We are also reaching out to this passenger to talk directly to him and further address and resolve this situation,” he said.Tyler Bridges, who posted video of Sunday’s incident on Twitter, wrote: “not a good way to treat a Doctor trying to get to work because they overbooked.”He described passenger reaction on the plane as “disturbed.”“Kids were crying,” he said.Bridges also wrote that the man appeared bloodied by his encounter with law enforcement and posted video showing him later running back on the plane, repeatedly saying, “I have to go home.”The man appeared to be pacing and disoriented.US airlines are allowed to involuntarily bump passengers off overbooked flights, with compensation, if enough volunteers cannot be found, according to the US Department of Transportation.last_img read more