Care More Than They Do

first_imgThis past weekend I stayed at a nice, expensive hotel in Washington, DC. I called to have the valet bring up my car so I could drive to a conference, and when I arrived at the front door of the hotel, a long line of people waiting for cars and taxis greeted me. All of them looked unhappy that no one was there to help them. But one couple looked especially unhappy.A few minutes passed, and the manager of the hotel arrived to tell the unhappy couple that the hotel had indeed lost their Range Rover. Yes, the valet took their automobile, and it was no longer in their parking garage. You might imagine that the couple wasn’t pleased by this news. They were angry, upset, and emotional. They pleaded with the manager to help them, to do something. At one point, the manager of the hotel turned to the couple and shouted: “Settle down! We’re looking for your car!”I was familiar with most all of the profanities that the unhappy, Range-Rover-missing couple uncorked on the hotel manager as they jumped in a taxi and took off. I have no idea how this story ended, but here’s the lesson: You have to care as much or more about your customer’s problem as they do—and they have to feel it.You Care, Or You Don’t CareIf you have clients, you are going to have problems (it comes with the territory). Some of the problems will be relatively small and easy to rectify. Other problems and challenges are going to stretch the limits of your imagination—and the limits of your resourcefulness.Here is the first law for dealing with client or customer problems:If your client believes that you care as much or more than they do about solving their problem, then you can survive problems of almost any size. If your client believes that you don’t care about them, you can’t survive even relatively small problems.The hotel manager was under stress. I am certain it was the first time a car disappeared on his watch. He was frustrated. But he stood face-to-face with his customers and argued with them about their missing car. He would have done better to stand beside them and look at their problem through their eyes. He was missing empathy; the ability to show his clients how much he cared.It matters greatly that you care. It matters even more that your client’s can feel that you care. There isn’t a substitute, and it can’t be faked. This is the real test for whether or not you win clients, and it’s the real test as to whether or not you retain them.QuestionsHow do your dream clients, your prospects, know that you care about them?How do your existing clients know that you care about them?When you have a problem with something you buy, how important is it the company and the person you ask for help care about you and the outcome you need?How do you demonstrate that you care and how does that caring impact your client relationships? Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Nowlast_img read more

The Leadership Playbook: The Value of Beliefs

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now The Wall Street Journal published a great article about Urban Meyer and the leadership coach he put on staff, Tim Kight. The gist of what Kight taught the team is that an event and the response together equal the outcome. In the terms Covey used, there is a gap between the stimulus and your response. You get to decide how you respond.Every time the Ohio State Buckeyes football team has experienced what should have been perceived as a seriously negative event, they have been coached to believe that they have an opportunity to decide how to respond. And they have had events that would have shaken the belief of any team, including the loss of two Heisman candidate quarterbacks, an early loss to a team they should have beaten on paper, and the disbelief of most all of their critics.What I hope strikes you most about all of this has nothing to do with football, nothing to with Meyer, and nothing to do with the amazing season Ohio State has had. They just serve as excellent examples of a bigger lesson.What I hope strikes you is that a high-performing, high achieving leader brought on a leadership coach for his team. He didn’t hire a coach to speak once, hoping that would be enough by itself to carry his team through the year. He made in investment in coaching and developing a certain mindset.I hope that you are struck by the fact that this leader believes so strongly that the game is won and lost first in the minds of his players and only then on the field. I hope you recognize the extraordinary power of belief when it comes to producing results. It is difficult to beat someone (or a team of someones) who refuses to allow themselves to be beaten in their minds.There is a power in morale, unit cohesion, esprit de corps. You don’t get this force multiplier when some people in a group share a different set of beliefs and when they don’t believe they are part of something.Leadership isn’t an easy art. But the heart of it may be in building the mindset and belief system that high-performing teams are built on.last_img read more

The Hustler’s Playbook: You Weren’t Born to Be Ordinary

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now You weren’t born to be ordinary. You were just infected by other people’s beliefs about what it’s okay to settle for.Your DNA is different. Your experiences are different. Your thoughts, wants, and desires are different. In many ways, we are all more alike than different, but the things that make you different are massive and magnificent. What makes you special is different than what makes someone else special, and what makes you special makes you extraordinary. But only if you believe and behave in accordance with this truth.Pure PotentialYou are pure potential. If you knew what you are really capable of, you would struggle to believe it. In fact, most of the reason you still have so much potential left to develop is that you don’t yet recognize that you have it. You don’t know what your superpowers are or why you were given your gifts (including the gifts that you don’t recognize as such when you receive them).Ordinary is something you are taught. You may have been infected with the idea that you are not to make waves, not to stand out, and not to draw attention to yourself. The people around you likely shared a set of common goals and beliefs like: go to school, get an education, get a good job, and work towards retirement. Even the people who love you will want to keep you safe, perhaps even telling you that using your gift is too dangerous, that you may get hurt.Pleased, Never SatisfiedYou weren’t put here to survive. You were put here to do something and to flourish. You’re here to reach your full potential and to make a difference.If you aren’t growing, then you are wasting your potential. It’s okay to be pleased with your results, but it isn’t okay to be satisfied. No matter how well you are doing, you have more potential in front of you than the potential you’ve developed in the past.If you stop striving to be more, do more, have more, and contribute more, then you are settling for something less than what you are truly capable of.last_img read more

Don’t Be a Red Shirt

first_imgOn the original Star Trek television series different characters wore different colored shirts. James T. Kirk, Mr. Spock, and Bones all wore blue shirts. Sometimes they wore some weird yellow shirt. But a lot of the characters wore red shirts, and wearing a red shirt meant you weren’t likely to be on Star Trek for long.As soon as there was trouble in an episode of Star Trek, people in red shirts were killed. A red shirt meant you were nothing more than fodder (Except Scotty, I think). People in blue shirts survived, no matter how unlikely the circumstances. Knowing this, why would you ever put on a red shirt?Red Shirt ThinkingRed shirts wait for the world to act upon them. They march steadily into their fate, believing everything that happens to them is inevitable. They believe the locus of control is external. For a red shirt, everything is outside of their control.When you believe that your results and your fate are determined by outside forces, you dis-empower yourself. Worse, when you believe you are playing an extra, you never live up to your full potential, depriving the world of your gifts. And all because of the color of your shirt.Change Your ShirtWhy not try on the blue shirt? Why not decide to be the hero in the story you tell instead of the victim?A Blue Shirt acts on their world. They determine the outcome, and when they don’t get exactly what they want, they go at it some other way, exercising their initiative and their resourcefulness. This, instead of marching to their fate as if they were some sort of automaton.Blue shirts are empowered. By who or what? By their beliefs about who they are and what they can do. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Madhepura MP Pappu Yadav arrested after clashes with police

first_imgMadhepura MP and leader of the Jan Adhikar party (Loktantrik) Rajesh Ranjan alias Pappu Yadav was arrested late on Monday night in Patna.Police said he was arrested in connection with an old case of creating chaos and fighting with policemen with brickbats near the Kargil Chowk in Patna on January 24.On Monday too, Mr. Yadav and his supporters clashed with the police during a protest march towards the State Assembly. They were protesting against the recent average hike of 55% in power tariff in the State and also to demand a CBI probe into the Bihar Staff Selection Commission (BSSC) question paper leak case.Police said the MP allegedly provoked his workers to attack the policemen.The Budget session is going on in the Legislature.At 11:30 p.m., the Gandhi Maidan police reached Mr. Yadav’s residence in Mandiri and took him into custody while hundreds of his supporters kept raising slogans in his favour.The police produced him before a judicial magistrate who sent him to jail.Around midnight, Mr. Yadav was lodged in the Beur central jail of Patna.Mr. Yadav is husband of Congress MP from Supaul Ranjit Ranjan.Mr. Yadav, of late, has been making provocative statements against Chief Minister Nitish Kumar and his ruling alliance partner RJD chief Lalu Prasad, alleging that the government had planned to kill him.“Our workers heard two police officials talking about the government order to have me killed right at the rally venue. Is this how a democracy functions? It is a citizens’ birthright to stage protests when democracy does not function properly,” the MP said on Monday.Sources told The Hindu that before Mr. Yadav was taken into police custody, he spoke to Lok Sabha Speaker and apprised her of the development.The MP is likely to appeal in court on Tuesday against his arrest.last_img read more

Bengal doctors jittery over attacks

first_imgConcerned over attacks on doctors at State-run hospitals by family members of patients, the Alternative People’s Health Initiative (APHI), a forum of doctors and other health workers, came out with several suggestions to curb such attacks on them. Representatives of eight State-run hospitals are part of the APHI. The development assumes significance with the Trinamool Congress government trying to streamline practices of private hospitals in the State. On March 3, the Assembly passed the West Bengal Clinical Establishments (Registration, Regulation and Transparency) Bill, 2017, bringing the functioning of private hospitals under greater government scrutiny.“In the month of March alone, two cases have come in the public domain where two doctors working in the State-run SSKM (Seth Sukhlal Karnani Memorial Hospital) and R.G. Kar Medical College and Hospital were assaulted,” APHI’s convener Baishali Biswas told The Hindu.According to the APHI, such assaults are mostly carried out by relatives of patients who accuse the doctors of negligence. The organisation has recently come out with an eight-point proposal to curb such attacks on doctors.Referral systemOne of the key suggestions in the proposal is the setting up of a centralised referral system, which will have updated information regarding the availability of beds and other facilities at government-run hospitals in the State. Pointing out that there is a tendency to refer patients to super-speciality hospitals from primary rural health centres, representatives of the APHI said that the related information should be accessible to both doctors and patients. “The referral system should be overhauled. Initiative has to taken to ensure that patients get proper treatment even if they are referred to district or block hospitals instead of super-speciality hospitals,” the proposal stated.The APHI argued that the “absence of standard operating procedure”, especially with regard to emergency cases, leads to confusion and chaos among both doctors and family members of patients. They also said that the in order to boost the government healthcare system, the vacant posts in hospitals have to be filled urgently.APHI will discuss the impact of legislation on State-run doctors at a convention to be held on April 19.last_img read more

Maoist identity in doubt

first_imgA Dongria Kondh woman from the Niyamgiri area of Odisha, Rasmita Sikoka alias Kuni (20), alleged to be a Maoist cadre with a reward of ₹1 lakh on her head, surrendered along with five other alleged Maoist militias on Wednesday, Rayagada police claimed.But the Maoist identity of the woman as well as her surrender has caused a controversy. She is the daughter-in-law of Dadhi Pusika (62), a leading activist of the Niyamgiri Suraksha Samiti (NSS). She is also the niece of another key NSS activist Lada Sikoka.The tribals of the Niyamgiri hills spread over the Rayagada and Kalahandi districts have been resisting mining in the region under the banner of the NSS since 2003.The police say Ms. Sikoka was an armed cadre of the Niyamgiri Dalam of Maoists and was involved in several incidents of Maoist violence.But the claims of police were challenged by social activists and organisations.They allege that Ms. Sikoka had been taken away from her in-laws’ home at the Gorata village at around midnight on May 1.last_img read more

Rajasthan braces for quota stir

first_imgSecurity has been tightened in the eastern Rajasthan districts of Bharatpur, Dausa, Karauli and Dholpur on Monday ahead of a “Mahapanchayat” (sit-in) announced by Gujjars to press for 5% reservation for the community in the Other Backward Classes (OBC) quota. The agitation is proposed to be launched at Adda village near Bayana on Tuesday.A 15-member delegation of Gujjars arrived here on Monday to hold talks with the State government on the contentious issue. However, Gujjar Aarakshan Sangharsh Samiti convenor Kirori Singh Bainsla did not come for negotiations.The talks of Gujjars with a group of Ministers, led by Social Justice and Empowerment Minister Arun Chaturvedi, and senior government officers were continuing at the State Secretariat here till late in the evening. Meanwhile, prohibitory orders under Section 144 of Criminal Procedure Code have been imposed in Bharatput district till May 31.Col. Bainsla said in Bharatpur that the deliberations at the meeting would be shared with the community on Tuesday to decide their future course of action. The Rapid Action Force battalions have been sent to Bayana, Hindon and Bharatpur towns to deal with any untoward situation.The State government had created a “most backward” category within OBCs for Gujjars and four other nomadic communities and given them 5% reservation through a Bill passed in the Assembly on October 26 last year, increasing the OBC quota from 21% to 26% and taking the overall quota in the State to 54%.The Rajasthan HC restrained the State government on November 9, 2017, from implementing the provisions of the Bill. Later, the Supreme Court also restrained the State government from taking any action or decision on the administrative side or in any manner conferring the benefit of reservation which will have the result of crossing the total reservation beyond 50%. The apex court has since asked the State government to maintain status quo till the High Court decides a pending case against the impugned Bill.last_img read more

Congress urges Goa Governor to dismiss BJP-led coalition in Goa, says “govt. is in ICU”

first_imgThe Congress on Wednesday appealed to Goa Governor Mridula Sinha to dismiss the BJP-led coalition government in the State and also warned of a state-wide protest if its demand is not met. In a strongly-worded statement issued here on Wednesday, the Congress claimed that the State administration was in ICU due to the repeated hospitalisation of ailing Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar, and also some of his Cabinet colleagues. “We once again appeal to the Governor to intervene into the matter…and dismiss this government. Today, there is Emergency-like situation in Goa,” Goa Pradesh Congress president Girish Chodankar said in a statement issued on Wednesday evening. The statement comes on the day when ailing Chief Minister Parrikar is scheduled to leave for the U.S. for treatment, for the third time in six months.The Chief Minister has been unwell since February this year and has been hospitalised on multiple occasions in hospitals in Goa, Mumbai and the U.K.. To run the administration in his absence from March to June, when he was undergoing treatment in New York, Mr. Parrikar had appointed a three-member ministerial committee to oversee routine government affairs.However, BJP sources on Wednesday claimed that the ailing Chief Minister is keen on keeping the decision-making powers to himself, during his visit to US. A core committee of Goa BJP, which had gone to meet the CM in Mumbai on Wednesday returned after he reportedly told them that he would soon return to Goa from the U.S. and ruled out any need to handover charge to anyone else as he would monitor the administration from the U.S..Union Minister of State for AYUSH Shripad Naik, who is also a North Goa MP said that Mr. Parrikar was expected to return from the U.S. in a week’s time. “Manohar Parrikar’s obstinate insistence on sticking to his chair is jeopardizing not only his own health but it is also adversely impacting the administration and health of the State,” Mr. Chodankar said.“The BJP and ruling allies, the Maharashtrawadi Gomantak Party and Goa Forward Party had no right to hold the State and it’s people to ransom through emotional blackmail by cashing on people’s sentiment of goodwill towards a sick man. Mr. Parrikar and BJP should stop thinking that he is irreplaceable and come out of his self-induced hallucination that all his colleagues are incompetent and useless to adorn the chair of Chief Minister,” Mr. Chodankar said.last_img read more

Goods train catches fire near Dahanu Road, several trains cancelled

first_imgFire on a goods train gutted down two coaches on Thursday night near Dahanu Road, leading to several trains being cancelled and services affected on Friday morning. The incident occured around 10.35 p.m. on Thursday on the Uttar Pradesh line (towards Mumbai) between Dahanu Road and Vangaon station. According to railway officials, the overhead equipment had melted due to the fire and as a result traffic services in that section were completely disrupted on Friday morning. There were no casualties reported.The line was made operational at 9.10 a.m. on Friday. While the Down Line had been restored 1.35 a.m. after repair works carried out over night, services were operating with speed restrictions.Due to the fire, 12 trains had to be either cancelled or short-terminated, including the Mumbai-Surat Flying Ranee. Suburban services in the morning were being operated till Boisar, before the UP line was made operational. Four long-distance trains were also diverted, including the Pune-Ahmedabad Duronto Express.            List of Affected TrainsDIVERTED TRAINS11095(ADI-PUNE) JCO 8/11/18  DRD ARR 0.55  DIVERTED VIA BHET-JL,12298(PA-ADI) DURANTO JCO 8/11/18 DIVERTED VIA KYN, JL, ST22475(HSR-CBE) JCO 8/11/18 VIA BHET-JL12264(NZM-PUNE) JCO 8/11/18 VIA BHET-JL22944(IND-PA) JCO 8/11/18 VIA BHET-JLOTHER AFFECTED TRAINS69173 (Virar- Dahanu Rd) of 8-11-2018 & 69174 (Dahanu Rd– Borivali ) JCO 9-11-2018 are cancelled.59442 (Ahmedabad- Mumbai Central ) JCO 8-11-2018 Will Be Short Terminated at Vapi  & reversed as 59439 ex Vapi.59024/59023 (Valsad-Mumbai Central-Valsad) & 12935(Bandra T-Surat)  JCO 9-11-2018 are Cancelled.22954 (Ahmedabad-Mumbai Central) JCO  9-11-2018 is short terminated at Surat & wl be reversed as 22953 ex Surat to Ahmedabad ie will be cancelled bet ST- MMCT-Surat.12922/12921 (Surat-Mumbai Central-Surat) JCO 9-11-2018 Is Cancelled.59038(Surat -Virar) JCO 9-11-2018 Is Short terminated  at Valsad.19016(Porbandar Mumbai Central) JCO 8-11-18 is short terminated at Surat & reversed as 19015 JCO 9-11-18  ex Surat to Porbander22444 (Bandra T–Kanpur Cntrl ) JCO 9-11-18 sch departure 5.10 hrs is Rescheduled at 8.05 hrs.12009(Mumbai Central -Ahmedabad ) JCO 9-11-2018  sch departure 6.25 hrs, is rescheduled at  8.25 hrs.19023(Mumbai Central -Firozpur ) JCO 9-11-2018 scheduled departure at 7.25 hrs is Rescheduled at 10.20 hrs i.e. 2.55 Late.12922/12921 (Surat-Mumbai Central-Surat ) JCO 9-11-2018 Is Cancelled.59038(Surat-Virar) JCO 9-11-2018 Is Short terminated at Valsad.19016(Porbandar – Mumbai Central) JCO 8-11-2018 is short terminated at Surat & reversed as 19015 JCO 9-11-18  ex Surat to Porbander.12932 (Ahmedabad -Mumbai Central) JCO  9-11-2018 is short terminated at Valsad  & reversed as 12931 ex Valsad to Ahmedabad.12934 (Ahmedabad -Mumbai Central ) JCO  9-11-2018 is short terminated at VAPI & reversed as 12933 ex VAPI  to Ahmedabad.59441(Mumbai Central -Ahmedabad ) JCO 8-11-2018 is short terminated at Vasai Road and cancelled between Vasai Road-Ahmedabad .17204(CAO – Bhavnagar ) JCO 8-11-2018  diverted Via Jalgaon-Surat.15068(Bandra Terminus -Gorakhpur) JCO 9-11-2018  diverted Via Vasai Road -Kalyan -Jalgaon.61002 (Domivli-Boisar) of 9-11-18 is short Terminated at Vasai Rd & Cancelled bet Vasai Rd -Boisar.61001 Boisar-Vasai Rd of 9-11-18 is cancelled. 69164 Dahanu Rd–Panvel of 9-11-18 is Cancelled bet Dahanu Rd -Vasai Rd12936 (Surat – Bandra T) of 9-11-18 will be Cancelled. 59039 (Virar-Valsad ) of 9-11-2018 is Cancelled.last_img read more

Matua matriarch’s last rites today

first_imgThe body of the Matua community matriarch, Binapani Devi, was taken to the Matua Mahasangha headquarters known as ‘Thakurbari’ in the Thakurnagar area of North 24 Parganas district on Wednesday where thousands of people offered their respects. The last rites of Binapani Devi will be performed on Thursday. Binapani Devi, popularly referred to as ‘Boroma’, passed away at a city hospital late on Tuesday evening. She was 100. Her younger son, Manjul Krishna Thakur, said that Matuas from all over the country are coming to offer their respects.Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted immediately after her death describing her as an “icon of our times”. Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee described Binapani Devi’s demise as a “personal loss”. She added that ‘Boroma’ will be accorded a State funeral and given a gun salute.Influential communityMatuas are capable of influencing more than one Lok Sabha seat in the State. The influence of Binapani Devi and the Matua Mahasangha can be gauged by the fact that Prime Minister Narendra Modi before addressing a rally at Thakurnagar met ‘Boroma’ on February 2, 2019. In December 2018, the State government bestowed on her its highest honour — Bangabibhushan. Matuas are a religious sect of Bangladeshi Dalits who predominantly belong to the Namasudra caste. Boroma’s daughetr-in-law, Mamatabala Thakur, is a Trinamool Congress MP from Bongaon.last_img read more

2 LeT militants killed in Shopian

first_imgTwo Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) militants were killed in a pre-dawn operation by security forces in south Kashmir’s Shopian on Sunday.“On a credible input, a cordon and search operation was launched at Shopian’s Hend-Sitapur area. The hiding militants fired and, in the ensuing encounter, both of them were killed. Incriminating material, including arms and ammunition, was recovered from the site of the encounter,” said a police spokesperson. The police identified the slain militants as Javid Ahmad Bhat from Kulgam’s Redwani and Adil Bashir Wani from Kulgam’s Waripora.“These LeT militants were wanted for carrying out attacks on security establishments. Bhat had a long history of militancy-related crime, including planning and executing terror attacks. He was also responsible for recruiting youth from adjoining areas of Kulgam,” said the police.Bashir, police sources said, was a fresh recruit and had gone missing recently. Bhat took to arms in 2017. Hundreds of locals attended the funeral of the slain militants. As multiple rounds of funerals were held, locals said militants also attended one of the funerals.Protests over rape Mainstream political parties and separatist groups on Sunday condemned the alleged rape of a minor girl in Bandipora and demanded exemplary punishment for the perpetrators. Protests broke out on Sunday at a few places against the incident, with people demanding immediate exemplary action. At Khomeini Chowk, protesters clashed with police who had to fire tear gas darts to quell them.last_img read more

FIRST Up: Lawmakers to Examine Bill Renewing U.S. Research

first_imgHang on to your lab goggles. The haggling over a big chunk of U.S. science policy is picking up steam in Washington.This morning, the science committee of the U.S. House of Representatives will kick off discussion of competing proposals to renew and reshape science and education programs at the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and other federal funding agencies. Lawmakers on the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology are expected to hear praise for, and complaints about, bills put forward by the panel’s Republican majority and Democratic minority.Areas of contention are likely to include proposals to change how NSF evaluates grant proposals and “open-access” provisions that would allow scientific publishers to keep papers produced with government funding behind paywalls for up to 3 years. But there appears to be broad, bipartisan support for plans to bolster efforts to commercialize discoveries made with government funding, and to revamp federal computing research programs.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The flurry of legislative activity is focused on replacing the 2010 America COMPETES Act, which expired at the end of September. Although many of COMPETE’s goals enjoyed bipartisan support, this year’s effort to replace it has been marked by diverging legislative strategies and philosophical rifts among Republicans and Democrats, the House and the Senate, and various elements of the research community.Some of those differences may surface at today’s hearing, which will focus on a House Republican draft bill called the Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science, and Technology (FIRST) Act. FIRST does not address all the programs that were included in COMPETES. It does not include Department of Energy research, for instance, which Representative Lamar Smith (R-TX), the head of the House science panel, wants to address in a separate bill. And FIRST differs markedly from a Democratic alternative introduced last month that hews more closely to the COMPETES mold.In addition to concerns about some of FIRST’s NSF provisions, some university and research lobbyists have voiced doubts about the bill’s provisions on providing free access to scholarly papers based on government-funded research. At the moment, the White House is in the midst of a process that is encouraging agencies to develop open-access policies that would make government-backed papers freely available to the public within 1 year of publication. That guideline is the result of years of conflict and negotiations among publishers, funders, and researchers on how to provide access without harming business models that fund many journals and societies.FIRST, however, would extend the open-access deadline to 2 years after a paper’s publication , or up to 3 years if an agency determines that a scientific field would be “uniquely harmed without such extension.”That idea “is ludicrous,” writes Heather Joseph, executive director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, which supports shorter embargo periods, in an e-mail to ScienceInsider. “It is completely out of line with any of the dozens of other successful policies in effect globally, and would put the U.S. light years behind the rest of the word in terms of policies supporting innovation and competitiveness. … [I]t is shameful to call it a proposed ‘open access’ policy. The serious conversations that are happening about embargo periods after all this time are about how to make them as *short* as possible to maximize benefits to the public — not about locking content down further.”A trade group for major publishers, however, says the extension might make sense in some cases. The Association of American Publishers (AAP) “has always emphasized the need for flexibility with embargoes,” writes Andi Sporkin, an AAP spokesperson, in an e-mail. “We have articulated that position to Members of Congress among many others – all those who’ll listen.” And although the group says it would prefer to set open-access guidelines through the current White House process rather than legislation, “we are appreciative that Chairman Smith understands and supports the importance of flexibility.”Less controversial is a provision that calls on the White House to set up a new advisory panel that would study how best to organize and coordinate the federal government’s $3 billion STEM (science, technology, education, and mathematics) education portfolio. The bill would also block the White House from implementing many of the controversial proposals it made to reorganize STEM education programs in its 2014 budget request to Congress.Another FIRST proposal is drawing widespread, bipartisan support. Dubbed “Innovative Approaches to Technology Transfer,” it would provide grants of up to $3 million over 3 years to universities, federal laboratories, and other research institutes to jump-start efforts to commercialize federally funded discoveries. The plan, originally introduced in Congress as a bipartisan bill called the TRANSFER Act (H.R. 2981), would require major research funding agencies to earmark 0.05% of their grant budgets in 2014 and 2015 for the grants; the pot would grow to 0.1% of extramural funding in 2016 and 2017.That stream of money could “help to solve an intractable problem in technology transfer” by helping fund early-stage commercialization projects, a coalition of university groups wrote earlier this year in a letter to Smith expressing their support. “Not only will it encourage translational research that will better prepare discoveries for the marketplace, it will also urge research institutions and individual investigators to collaborate with industry and more fully incorporate considerations of commercial viability into their research enterprise.”There is also strong bipartisan backing for FIRST’s plan to revamp federal computing research. The provisions, which include a call for a new strategic plan on information technology R&D, were originally spelled out in a bill (H.R. 967) that passed the House last April on a 406-11 vote. Those popular provisions, however, aren’t likely to be enough persuade most House Democrats to support FIRST, and the process of reauthorizing COMPETES is likely to be long and contentious. The Senate’s science committee, meanwhile, has just begun to develop its version of COMPETES reauthorization, holding a first hearing last week.last_img read more

Baby Steps Toward Healing Hearing

first_imgThere is no biological cure for deafness—yet. We detect sound using sensory cells sporting microscopic hairlike projections, and when these so-called hair cells deep inside the inner ear are destroyed by illness or loud noise, they are gone forever. Or so scientists thought. A new study finds specific cells in the inner ear of newborn mice that regenerate these sensory cells—even after damage, potentially opening up a way to treat deafness in humans.Researchers knew that cells in the inner ear below hair cells—known as supporting cells—can become the sensory cells themselves when stimulated by a protein that blocks Notch signaling, which is an important mechanism for cell communication. Albert Edge, a stem cell biologist at Harvard Medical School in Boston, and his colleagues, attempted to identify the exact type of supporting cells that transform into sensory ones and fill in the gaps left by the damaged cells.The researchers removed the organ of Corti, which is housed within a seashell-shaped cavity called the cochlea and contains sensory hair cells, from newborn mice and kept the cells alive in culture plates. They damaged the hair cells using the antibiotic gentamicin, which destroys its sound-sensing projections. When they examined the organ of Corti under the microscope, they saw that small numbers of hair cells had regenerated on their own. But if they blocked Notch signaling, they saw even more regenerated hair cells, the team reports today in Stem Cell Reports. The number that developed varied, but in the base of cochlea, where the tissue received the most damage, hair cell numbers returned to about 40% of the original. “It’s interesting and encouraging that they are capable of regenerating,” Edge says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The researchers then tracked which supporting cells turned into hair cells by tagging them with a fluorescent chemical and watching the tissues for at least 4 days. By following the tag, they saw that only cells carrying a protein found in stem cells, called Lgr5, turned into new hair cells. “Knowing about these Lgr5 cells is valuable for us because it gives us a target cell population to study as we try to figure out how to better manipulate them and turn them into hair cells in an adult,” Edge says.The work contradicts previous studies that found that multiple types of unidentified supporting cells transform into hair cells when Notch signaling is blocked. In these studies, the hair cell growth occurred without any initial damage to the organ of Corti.The recent study follows a similar paper published earlier this month by developmental neurobiologist Jian Zuo, of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, who damaged sensory cells in live mice. Zuo also saw regeneration of hair cells from supporting cells, but most of the new cells died within 2 weeks. In humans, the organ of Corti matures in the womb, but in mice, the organ continues to mature for the first 10 days of life, so these same findings may not hold true in humans.Most people suffering from hearing loss are adults, so understanding how older cells turn off their ability to regenerate will be important in turning that ability back on. “We need to focus more into why does this work early [in life], and not later. That will be key,” says Alain Dabdoub, a developmental neuroscientist at the University of Toronto in Canada.last_img read more

Lectures aren’t just boring, they’re Ineffective, too, study finds

first_imgAre your lectures droning on? Change it up every 10 minutes with more active teaching techniques and more students will succeed, researchers say. A new study finds that undergraduate students in classes with traditional stand-and-deliver lectures are 1.5 times more likely to fail than students in classes that use more stimulating, so-called active learning methods.“Universities were founded in Western Europe in 1050 and lecturing has been the predominant form of teaching ever since,” says biologist Scott Freeman of the University of Washington, Seattle. But many scholars have challenged the “sage on a stage” approach to teaching science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses, arguing that engaging students with questions or group activities is more effective.To weigh the evidence, Freeman and a group of colleagues analyzed 225 studies of undergraduate STEM teaching methods. The meta-analysis, published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, concluded that teaching approaches that turned students into active participants rather than passive listeners reduced failure rates and boosted scores on exams by almost one-half a standard deviation. “The change in the failure rates is whopping,” Freeman says. And the exam improvement—about 6%—could, for example, “bump [a student’s] grades from a B– to a B.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)“This is a really important article—the impression I get is that it’s almost unethical to be lecturing if you have this data,” says Eric Mazur, a physicist at Harvard University who has campaigned against stale lecturing techniques for 27 years and was not involved in the work. “It’s good to see such a cohesive picture emerge from their meta-analysis—an abundance of proof that lecturing is outmoded, outdated, and inefficient.” Although there is no single definition of active learning approaches, they include asking students to answer questions by using handheld clickers, calling on individuals or groups randomly, or having students clarify concepts to each other and reach a consensus on an issue.Freeman says he’s started using such techniques even in large classes. “My introductory biology course has gotten up to 700 students,” he says. “For the ultimate class session—I don’t say lecture—I’m showing PowerPoint slides, but everything is a question and I use clickers and random calling. Somebody droning on for 15 minutes at a time and then doing cookbook labs isn’t interesting.” Freeman estimates that scaling up such active learning approaches could enable success for tens of thousands of students who might otherwise drop or fail STEM courses.Despite its advantages, active learning isn’t likely to completely kill the lecture, says Noah Finkelstein, a physics professor who directs the Center for STEM Learning at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and was not involved in the study. The new study “is consistent with what the benefits of active learning are showing us,” he says. “But I don’t think there should be a monolithic stance about lecture or no lecture. There are still times when lectures will be needed, but the traditional mode of stand-and-deliver is being demonstrated as less effective at promoting student learning and preparing future teachers.”The current study didn’t directly address the effectiveness of one new twist in the traditional lecturing format: massive open online courses that can beam talks to thousands or even millions of students. But Freeman says the U.S. Department of Education has conducted its own meta-analysis of distance learning, and it found there was no difference in being lectured at in a classroom versus through a computer screen at home. So, Freeman says: “If you’re going to get lectured at, you might as well be at home in bunny slippers.”last_img read more

Lockheed looks for partners on its proposed fusion reactor

first_imgThe leader of a proposed compact fusion reactor project says that Lockheed Martin’s decision to lift the lid on its secret effort is an attempt to build a scientific team and find partners.Speaking yesterday at a press conference at the company’s facility in Palmdale, California, Tom McGuire defended the project’s scientific merits: “We think we’ve invented something that is inherently stable,” McGuire told reporters. But he acknowledged that “we are very early in the scientific process.” He said he has been working with a team of five to 10 people for the past 4 years and hopes to expand the team now that the project is in the open.He said that their magnetic confinement concept combined elements from several earlier approaches. The core of the device uses cusp confinement, a sort of magnetic trap in which particles that try to escape are pushed back by rounded, pillowlike magnetic fields. Cusp devices were investigated in the 1960s and 1970s but were largely abandoned because particles leak out through gaps between the various magnetic fields leading to a loss of temperature. McGuire says they get around this problem by encapsulating the cusp device inside a magnetic mirror device, a different sort of confinement technique. Cylindrical in shape, it uses a magnetic field to restrict particles to movement along its axis. Extra-strong fields at the ends of the machine—magnetic mirrors—prevent the particles from escaping. Mirror devices were also extensively studied last century, culminating in the 54-meter-long Mirror Fusion Test Facility B (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. In 1986, MFTF-B was completed at a cost of $372 million but, for budgetary reasons, was never turned on.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Another technique the team is using to counter particle losses from cusp confinement is recirculation. “We recapture the flow of particles and route it back into the device,” McGuire said. The team has built its first machine and has carried out 200 shots during commissioning and applied up to 1 kilowatt of heating, but McGuire declined to detail any measurements of plasma temperature, density, or confinement time—the key parameters for a fusion plasma—but said the plasma appeared very stable. He said they would be ramping up heating over the coming months and would publish results next year.McGuire acknowledged the need for shielding against neutrons for the magnet coils positioned inside the reactor vessel. He estimates that between 80 and 150 centimeters of shielding would be needed, but this can be accommodated in their compact design. Researchers contacted by ScienceInsider say that it is difficult to estimate the final size of the machine without more knowledge of its design. Lockheed has said its goal is a machine 7 meters across, but some estimates had suggested that the required shielding would make it considerably larger.last_img read more

Indian American Actress Mouzam Makkar Set for Series Regular Role on Mindy Kaling’s NBC Show

first_imgIndia-West had earlier reported that the new NBC comedy by Indian American actress Mindy Kaling and “The Mindy Project’s” Charlie Grandy, “Champions,” will feature Indian American actor Hasan Minhaj. Kaling dropped the trailer of the new show on Instagram Jan. 31 and we spotted another Indian American talent: Mouzam Makkar.Makkar has won a series regular role on the show, written by Grandy and Kaling, which centers on Vince, played by Anders Holm, who is living every bachelor’s dream. He owns the fifth largest gym in Brooklyn, dates an endless string of beautiful women, and lives with his dumb, lovable brother Matthew, portrayed by Andy Favreau. But Vince’s simple life gets complicated fast when his high school fling, Priya (Kaling), unexpectedly drops off their 15-year-old son, Michael, so he can attend a city school for super-talented kids.Read it at India West Related Itemslast_img read more

Canadian Citizenship For Indians Rise By 50% As H-1B Visa Rules Tighten

first_imgAs the Trump administration continues to tighten the H-1B visa rules, there has been a 50% rise in citizenship granted to Indians in the period of 10 months ending October 2018. Several thousands of Indians have opted for the Canadian citizenship after spending the specified duration for permanent residence. Nearly 15,000 Indians obtained citizenship during that period, which is a significant rise of 50% from last year.Read it at Business Today Related Itemslast_img

Ex-honors Student Gets 33 Years In Marijuana Dealer Trupal Patel’s Death

first_imgA former community college honors student has been sentenced to 33 years in prison in the death of an Indian American marijuana dealer authorities say was shot by the defendant’s former boyfriend.The felony murder sentence imposed Jan. 18 on 21-year-old Raquel Garajau will require the ex-Brookdale Community College student to serve 30 years before being eligible for parole, The Asbury Park Press reported.Read it at India West Related Itemslast_img